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Full text of "The University of North Carolina Catalogue"

THE 

UNIVERSITY 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

« 

CATALOGUE 

1895-96 



CHAPEL HILL 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1896 



Cbc Untoersitg press 

Chapel Hill 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Calendar _ 6 

The University.: .'. _ r 7-17 

Foundation and Government _ 7-9 

Location 9 

Equipment 9, 30 

Departments of Instruction _•. 10 

College Year — - 10 

Degrees ] 

Students not Candidates for a Degree 10 

Graduate Students 10 

Physical Culture 10, 11 ' 

General Culture 11 

Religious Culture - 11 

Discipline 11 

• Medical Attention 11 

Boards of Government and Instruction. _ 12-17 

Trustees ....... 12-15 

Faculty _ ■ 15 

Instructors and Assistants.— _. 16 

Other Officers 16,17 

Departments of the University 18 

The College _ _ 19-69 

Faculty 19 

Other Instructors, and Assistants 19, 20 

Courses of Instruction.—: 21-40 

Courses leading to Degrees — _ _. 41-43 

Grades of Scholarship 43, 44 

Degrees with Distinction 44 

Commencement Parts 44 

Honors — ... — 44,45 

Special Certificates..'-. - 45 



4 CONTENTS 

Courses for Students not Condidates for a Degree 45, 46 

Graduate Students _ 47-49 

Admission 47 

Degrees . . 47 

The Degrees of A.M., Ph.M., and S.M 48 

The Degree of Ph.D 48,49 

Pecuniary Aid and Expenses 50-53 

Medals and Prizes- 50,51 

Scholarships _ 51,52 

Free Tuition..- _ 52 

Loan Funds— _ _ _.. 52 

Expenses.. _ _ _ 52,53 

•-•Assignment of Booms.— . 53 

Requirements for Admission—. 54-58 

Admission into the Freshman Class 54-56 

Admission to Advanced Standing.— _ 56,57 

Examinations for the Removal of Conditions 57 

Admission of Optional Students _. 58 

Registration 58 

Students - 59-69 

The Law School _._ _. 70-75 

Faculty — — 70 

Courses of Instruction _ _ 70-72 

The Degree of LL.B 72 

Expenses _ 72 

Admission and Registration - __ 72,73 

Summer School — — _ 73 

Students _ ..._. _ _ _ 73-75 

The Medical School _ __ _ 76-79 

Foundation- _ _ 76 

Faculty _ 77 

Courses of Instruction — 77, 78 

Pecuniary Aid — - — — 78 

Expenses 78 

Admission and Registration . _ .78,79 

Students _ _ 79 



contents 5 

The Summer School _ _ 80-89 

Faculty _ _ - 80 

Instructors : — 80 

Courses of Instruction 81-84 

Educational Conferences 84 

Certificates - _ .. 84 

Expenses _ 84, 85 

Admission and Registration.— __ ._ 85 

Students _ 86-89 

The University Library.... 90, 91 

The Physical Laboratory 92 

The Chemical Laboratory 93, 94 

The Biological Laboratory.. «95 

The Geological Laboratory _ 90, 97 

The Gymnasium 98 

The University Organizations 99-103 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies 99 

The Philological Club- 100 

The Shakspere Club 100. 101 

The North Carolina Historical Society 101 

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 101, 102 

The Young Men's Christian Association- _ _ 102,103 

One Hundredth Commencement _ 104-107 

Baccalaureate Sermon 104 

Alumni Day:. _ 104 

Commencement' 104-107 

Degrees.— _ 105 

Honors _ 106 

Special Certificates.— __ 107 

Medals and Prizes- _ 107 

-Summary _ 108 

Index _ _ _, _ 109,110 






CALENDAR. 



1896. 

Aug. 31 to Sept. 5, Monday to Saturday, inclusive. Examinations 

for the Removal of Conditions. 

Sept. 2, 3, It, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. Examinations for Ad- 
mission into the College. 

Sept. 3, 4, Thursday, Friday. Registration. 



Assignment of Rooms. 
Lectures begin. 
University Day. 
President's Reception. 
Thanksgiving Day. 



Sept. 5, Saturday. 
Sept. 7, Monday. 
Oct. 12, Monday. 
Oct. 12, Monday. 
Nov. 29, Thursday. 

Recess from December 23, 1896. to January 5, 1897, inclu- 
sive. 
1897. 
Jan. 5, 6, Tuesday, Wednesday. Examinations for Admission into 
the College. 
Registration. 
Assignment of Rooms. 
Lectures begin. 
Washington's Birthday. 
Senior Orations. 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Anniversary of the Alumni. 
Orations by Representatives from the Dia- 
lectic and Philanthropic Literary So- 
cieties. 
Senior Class Day. 
Commencement. 



Jan. 6, Wednesday 
Jan. 6, Wednesday. 
Jan. 7, Thursday. 
Feb. 22, Monday. 
May 1, Saturday. 
May 30, Sunday. 
Junel, Tuesday. 
June 1, Tuesday. 
June 1, Tuesday. 



June 1, Tuesday. 
June 2, Wednesday. 



THE UNIVERSITY. 



Foundation and Government. The University was estab- 
lished in obedience to the first Constitution of the State, which 
was adopted in December, 1776. A clause of Section XLI. declared 
that "all useful learning- shall be duly encouraged, and promoted 
in one or more universities." The Charter was granted by the 
General Assembly in 1789, the corner stone of the Old East Build- 
ing was laid in 1793 and the University was opened in 1795. 

The title, preamble, and first section of the Act of incorporation 
are as follows : — 

"An Act to establish a University in this State : 

•'Whereas in all well reg-ulated Governments, it is the indis- 
pensable Duty of every Legislature to consult the Happiness of a 
rising Generation, and endeavor to fit them for an honourable Dis- 
charge of the social Duties of Life, by paying the strictest Atten- 
tion to their Education: And whereas an University supported by 
permanent Funds, and well endowed, would have the most direct 
Tendency to answer the above Purpose: 

"I. Beit therefore enacted by the General Assembly of the State of 
North-Carolina, and it is liereby enacted by llie Authority of the same, 
That Samuel Johnston, James Iredell, Charles Johnston, Hugh William- 
son. Stephen Cabarrus, Richard Dobbs Spaight, William Blount, Ben- 
jamin Williams, John Sitgreaves, Frederick Hargett, Robert Snead, 
Archibald Maclaine, Honourable Samuel Aslie, Robert Dixon, Benja- 
min Smith, Honourable Samuel Spencer, John Hay, James Hogg, Henry 
William Harrington, William Barry Grove,"Reverend Samuel M'Corkle, 
Adlai Osborne, John Stokes, John Hamilton, Joseph Graham, Honoura- 
ble John Williams, Thomas Person, Alfred Moore, Alexander Mebane, 
Joel Lane, Willie Jones, Benjamin Hawkins, John Haywood, senior, 
John Macon, William Richardson Davie, Joseph Dixon, William Lenoir, 
Joseph M'Dowell, James Holland and William Porter, Esquires, shall 
be and they are hereby declared to be a Body politic and corpo- 



8 THE UNIVERSITY 

rate, to be known and distinguished by the Name of The Trustees 
of the University of North-Carolina ;* and by that Name shall have 
perpetual Succession, and a common Seal: and that they the Trus- 
tees and their Successors, by the Name aforesaid, or a Majority of 
them, shall be able and capable in Law to take, demand, receive and 
possess all Monies, Goods and Chattels that shall be given them for 
the Use of the said University, and the same apply according to 
the Will of the Donors, and by Gift, Purchase or Devise to take, 
have, receive, possess, enjoy and retain to them and their Succes- 
sors forever, any Lands, Rents, Tenements and Hereditaments, of 
what Kind, Nature or Quality soever the same may be, in special 
Trust and Confidence that the same or the Profits thereof shall be 
applied to and for the Use and Purposes of establishing and endow- 
ing the said University."! 

The University is governed by a Board of Trustees elected by the 
Legislature, and is free from sectional, sectarian, or political con- 
trol. The Governor of the State is ex officio President of the Board 
of Trustees. 

Article IX. of the Constitution of 1876 contains the following pro- 
visions regarding the University: — 

" Sec. 6. The General Assembly shall have power to provide for 
the election of Trustees of the University of North Carolina, in 
whom, when chosen, shall be vested, all the privileges, rights, fran- 
chises and endowments thereof, in anywise granted to or conferred 
upon the Trustees of said University: and the General Assembly 
may make such provisions, laws and regulations from time to time, 
as may be necessary and expedient for the maintenance and man- 
agement of said University. 

"Sec. 7. The General Assembly shall provide that the benefits 
of the University, as far as practicable, be extended to the youth 
of the State free of expense for tuition: also, that all the property 
which has heretofore accrued to the State, or shall hereafter 
accrue, from escheats, unclaimed dividends, or distributive shares 

*The corporate name has been changed to The University of North Carolina. 
tLaws of the State of North-Carolina, published by .Tames Iredell. Edenton, 
1791. 



THE UNIVERSITY 9 

of the estates of deceased persons, shall be appropriated to the use 
of the University." 

LOCATION. The seat of the University is Chapel Hill, Orange 
County, twenty-eight miles northwest of Raleigh. Three daily 
passenger trains run between Chapel Hill and University Junc- 
tion, a station on the North Carolina Railroad. The site for the 
institution was selected because of its uncommon healthfulness, 
its freedom from malaria, its supply of pure water, its beau- 
tiful scenery and its central position in the State. 

Equipment. The University campus contains forty-eight acres 
of land, affording ample ground for buildings and for all sorts of 
athletic sports. The University owns, contiguous to the campus, 
five hundred acres of forest land, which is partly laid off into walks 
and drives. The University has eleven buildings. 

The South Buildiing contains the college offices, three lecture- 
rooms, the Physical Laboratory and twenty-six dormitories. 

The Old East Building contains two lecture-rooms and twenty- 
eight dormitories. 

The Old West Building contains four lecture-rooms, the Histor- 
ical Museum, the University Co-operative Society's store and 
twenty-four dormitories. 

Person Hall contains the Chemical Laboratory and Museum and 
a lecture-room. 

Gerrard Hall is used for Morning Prayers, for the meetings of the 
Young Men's Christian Association and for public lectures. 

Smith Hall contains the College Library and the Reading-room. 
The basement is fitted up with bath-rooms and lavatories. 

The New West Building contains the Dialectic Literary Society's 
Hall, a lecture-room and fifteen dormitories. 

The New East Building contains the Philanthropic Literary So- 
ciety's Hall, the Biological Laboratory and Museum, the Geolog- 
ical and Mineralogical Laboratory and Museum, two lecture- 
rooms and fifteen dormitories. 

Memorial Hall commemorates the illustrious dead of the Univer- 
sity. It is used during the session as a gymnasium, and at Com- 
mencement, for public exercises. 

The Dissecting Hall, fitted up for the use of the Medical School, 
is apart from the other buildings. 



10 THE UNIVERSITY 

The Infirmary contains five rooms, which are properly furnished 
for the care and treatment of the sick. 

Departments of Instruction. The University embraces 
the following Departments of Instruction: the College (for Under- 
graduates and Graduates), the Law School, the Medical School 
and the Summer School. 

College Year. The College Year begins on the first Thursday 
in September. Commencement is held on the Wednesday before 
the first Thursday in June. The summer vacation begins at Com- 
mencement, and ends on the Wednesday before the first Thurs- 
day in September. There is a Christmas recess of about ten days. 
The twelfth of October (University Day), Thanksgiving Day, the 
twenty-second of February (Washington's Birthday), and the first 
of May (Senior Orations), are holidays. 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Philosophy, 
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, and Bachelor of Laws, 
are conferred by the vote of the Trustees, after the recommenda- 
tion of the Faculty, upon candidates who have satisfied the require- 
ments of residence and study at the University. All degrees con- 
ferred are announced at Commencement. 

Students not Candidates for a Degree. Students who are 
not candidates for a degree may select any studies they wish, devot- 
ing their time entirely to one or two subjects, or selecting groups 
of such subjects as suit their taste and purposes. 

The Faculty have arranged several groups of studies for the 
benefit of students desiring brief preparation for teaching, or for 
the study of law or medicine. 

Graduate Students. Free instruction is offered in the Col- 
lege to graduates of colleges and universities. 

Physical Culture. Hearty encouragement is given to athletic 
sports and to all kinds of physical culture. Athletic Field fur- 
nishes ample facilities for football and baseball. The Lake Track, 
recently donated by Mr. Henry S. Lake, of the Class of 1898, is admi- 
rably adapted for running, bicycling and general track athletics. 
Fifteen tennis courts, belonging to the various tennis clubs, are 
conveniently located in the Campus, 



/ 

THE UNIVERSITY 11 

Systematic exercise in Memorial Hall under a skilled instructor 
is required of all students in the College, except Seniors. The Hall 
is so spacious and so thoroughly aired and lighted that it furnishes 
a place for physical exercise almost as healthful as in the open 
air. The University recognizes the training and intelligent care 
of the body as essential to intellectual power and culture. 

General Culture. The University endeavors to furnish such 
general culture outside the lecture-rooms and laboratories as will 
broaden the minds and sympathies of young men and arouse their 
ambition. Lectures are delivered about once a month, and musical 
entertainments are given occasionally. 

Religious Culture. Prayers are conducted in Gerrard Hall, 
with the reading of the Scriptures and singing, every week-day 
morning at 8:15 o'clock. Attendance at this service is required of 
all members of the College, unless especially excused. 

Bible classes for young men are taught in each of the four 
churches of the village every Sunday. Religious exercises are 
held twice a week, or oftener, in each church. 

A series of University Sermons is preached monthly, in Gerrard 
Hall, under the auspices of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Bible lectures are delivered every Sunday morning in Gerrard 
Hall. 

The Young Men's Christian Association meets four times a week, 
in Gerrard Hall, for prayer, song and other services. 

The moral tone of the University is high ; its religious life is 
active, broad and tolerant. 

Discipline. The University endeavors to make young men 
manly and self-reliant, and to develop character by educating the 
conscience. The Faculty may. at their discretion, admonish, sus- 
pend or dismiss students for neglect of duty or for misconduct. 

Medical Attention. On the payment of a small annual fee, 
each student receives the careful attention of the University Phy- 
sician. Dr. Richard Henry Whitehead. In this way the best med- 
ical advice is to be had at the least cost. The Physician makes 
visits daily, or oftener, to students confined to their rooms, or under 
treatment in the Infirmary ; and he may be seen daily at his office 
also for consultation, 



BOARDS OF GOVERNMENT AND IN- 
STRUCTION. 



TRUSTEES. 



ELIAS CARR, Governor, President ex officio of the Board of 

Trustees. 
RICHARD HENRY BATTLE, Secretary and Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Governor ELIAS CARR, Chairman. 
ALEXANDER B. ANDREWS, JOHN W. GRAHAM, 
RICHARD H. BATTLE, THOMAS S. KENAN, 

MARION BUTLER, RICHARD H. LEWIS, 

JULIAN S. CARR, VIRGIL S. LUSK, 

JAMES W. WILSON. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



1897.* 



NAME. COTTNTY. 

WILLIAM SAMUEL BLACK, D.D., Granville. 

CHARLES MATHER COOK, Franklin. 

RUFUS ALEXANDER DOUGHTON, Alleghany. 

PLEASANT DANIEL GOLD. Wilson. 

ROBERT T. GRAY, Wake. 

HAMILTON CHAMBERLAIN JONES, Mecklenburg. 

VIRGIL STUART LUSK, Buncombe. 

PARSONS HARRIS MORRIS, Randolph. 

PATRICK LIVINGSTON MURPHY, M.D., Burke. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH PEELE, Wake. 

WILLIAM DASSEY PRUDEN, Chowan. 

"The legal term of office expires November 30 of the year indicated. 



TRUSTEES 



13 



"wallace carl riddick, 
noah james rouse, 
daniel lindsay russell, 
robert walker scott, 
prank shepherd spruill, 
neal angus sinclair, 
samuel Mcdowell tate. 
j. m. thomas, 
david alexander white, 



Wake. 

Lenoir. 

New Hanover. 

Alamance. 

Franklin. 

Cumberland. 

Burke. 

Rutherford. 

Alamance. 



1899.- 

kemp plummer battle, ll.d. 
charles randolph thomas, 
marsden bellamy, 
george samuel bradshaw. 
marion butler, 
pabius haywood busbee, 
bennehan cameron, 
john william fries, 
Robert Mcknight furman, 
william anderson guthrie, 
thomas stephen kenan, 
richard henry lewis, m.d., 

JOHN ALTON McIVER, 
WILLIAM NELSON MEBANE,* 
ABRAM HAYWOOD MERRITT, 
JAMES DIXON MURPHY, 
FREDERICK PHILIPS, 
JESSE LINDSAY PATTERSON, 
JOHN WESLEY STARNES, 
JAMES WILLIAM WILSON, 



Orange. 
Craven. 

New Hanover. 

Randolph. 

Sampson. 

Wake. 

Orange. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Durham. 

Wake. 

Wake. , 

Moore. 

Rockingham. 

Chatham. 

Buncombe. 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Burke. 



1901. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS ALLEN, 
ALEXANDER BOYD ANDREWS, 



Wayne. 
Wake. 



•Deceased. 



14 



■Trustees 



RICHARD HENRY BATTLE. Wake. 

JACOB BATTLE, Nash. 

JOSEPH PEARSON CALDWELL. Mecklenburg. 

JULIAN SHAKESPEARE CARR, Durham. 

WILLIAM HENRY DAY, Halifax. 

SIDNEY MICHAEL FINGER. Catawba. 

R. D. GILMER. Haywood. 

AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON GRAHAM, Granville. 

ALFRED WILLIAMS HAYWOOD, Wake. 

WILLIAM E. HILL. Duplin. 

EDMUND JONES, Caldwell. 

THOMAS ALEXANDER McNEILL, Robeson. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS MASON. Northampton. 

PAUL BARRINGER MEANS. Cabarrus. 

LEE S. OVERMAN. Rowan. 

JAMES PARKER, Gates. 
THOMAS HENDERSON PRITCHARD, D.D., Mecklenburg. 

DAVID GASTON WORTH, New Hanover. 

1903. 



ABNER ALEXANDER. Tyrrell. 

E. SPENCER BLACKBURN, Ashe. 
WILLIAM HYSLOP SUMNER BURGWYN, Vance. 

JAMES EDMUNDS BOYD. Greensboro. N 

MELVILLE E. CARTER,* Buncombe. , 

CHARLES ALSTON COOK, Warren. 

ALBERT BARROW GORRELL, Forsyth, -v 

JOHN WASHINGTON GRAHAM, Orange. 

JOHN THOMAS HOGAN. Orange. * 

J. T. B. HOOVER, Wilson, v 

JAMES BARLOW LLOYD, Edgecombe.-* 

THOMAS FRANKLIN LLOYD. Orange. . 

JAMES M. MOODY. Haywood.> 

ROBERT BRUCE PEEBLES, Northampton. 

HARRY SKINNER, Pitt., 

'Deceased. 



FACULTY 15 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Onslow., 

ZKBULON BAIRD WALSER. Lexington.. 

ELIHU ANTHONY WHITE, Perquimans. 

STEPHEN OTHO WILSON. Wake. 

FRANCIS DONNELL WINSTON, Bertie. 



FACULTY. 

GEORGE TAYLOE WINSTON, LL.D.. President of the Univer- 
sity, and Professor of Political and Social Science. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D.. Alumni Professorof History. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., Smith Professor of Gen- 
eral and Analytical Chemistry. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B.. [State Geologist.) Lecturer on 
the Geology of YoW/i Carolina. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics.4 

JOHN MANNING, LL.D., Professor of Law. 

THOMAS HUME, D.D., LL.D., Professor of the English Language 
and Literature. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A.. Professor of Modem Languages. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D.. LL.D.,f Professorof the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C.E., Professorof Mathematics. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, M.D.. Professor of Anatomy, 
Physiology and Materia Mediea. 

HENRY HORACE WILLIAMS, A.M.. B.D.. Professor of Philoso- 
phy. 

HENRY VAN PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professorof Biology. 

KARL POMEROY HARRINGTON, A.M., Professor of the Latin 
Language and Literature. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, Ph.B., Professor of Pedagogy.^ 

FRANCIS KINGSLEY BALL, Ph.D., Professorof the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Assistant Prefessor of Chem- 
istry. 

tMinister to Greece, Eouirsnia and Servin, on leave of absence from the T"ni- 
versity. 



16 IN8TKXTCTOK8 AND ASSISTANTS 

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

JAMES EDWARD SHEPHERD. LL.D.. Associate Professor of Law 
in the Summer Law School. 

GEORGE STOCKTON WILLS. Ph.B.. Instructor in English. 

HERMAN HARRELL HORNE, A.M., Instructor in Modern Lan- 
guages. 

GEORGE GULLETT STEPHENS. Instructor in Physical Culture. 

GEORGE PHINEAS BUTLER. B.E.. Instructor in Mathematics. 

FREDERICK LOUIS CARR. Ph.B., Instructor in Latin. 

PHILANDER PRIESTLY CLAXTON. A.M., (Professor of Peda- 
gogics in tlte State Normal and Industrial School,) Instructor in 
Educational Psychology and Methods in the Summer School. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE. (Superintendent of the 
Wilmington City Schools,) Instructor in Methods in Arithmetic and 
Algebra in the Summer School. 

ALEXANDER GRAHAM. A.M.. (Superintendent of the Charlotte 
City Schools,) Instructor in English Grammar and Psychology in 
the Summer School. 

LOGAN DOUGLASS HOWELL. A.B.. {Superintendent of the Bul- 
eiqh City Schools.) Instructor in Elementary Latin in the Summer 
School. 

ELISHA BETTS LEWIS. Instructor in Geography in the Summer 
School. 

THOMAS JAMES WILSON. Jr.. A.B.. Instructor in Greek in the 
Summer School. 

MATHILDE COFFIN, (Supervisor of the Detroit City Schools,) 
Instructor in Primary Work in the Summer School. 

MINNIE BEDFORD, (Teacher in the Buleigh City Schools.) Instruc- 
tor in Primary Beading and Language-work in the Summer School. 

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM SMITH, Assistant in the Library. 

THOMAS CLARKE, Assistant in Chemistry. 

GEORGE HUGHES KIRBY. Assistant in Biology. 

WILLIAM RAND KENAN. Jr.. S.B.. Assistant in Physics. 

RICHARD GOLD ALLSBROOK, Assistant in the Library. 

ROBERT ERVIN COKER. Assistant in Biology, 

OTHER OFFICERS. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Secretary of the Faculty. 



OTHER OFFICERS 



It 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN. Ph.B.. Supervisor of the 

Library. 
BENJAMIN WYCHE, Litt.B., Librarian. 
EUGENE LEWIS HARRIS, Ph.B., Registrar. 
WILLIE THOMAS PATTERSON, Bursar. 



DEPARTMENT* OF THE EXIVEESITY. 



The University embraces the following departments: — 

The College (for Undergraduates and Graduates), 
The Law School. 
The Medical School. 
The Summer School. 



THE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 

GEORGE TAYLOE WINSTON, LL.D.. President of the University, 
and Professor of Political and Social Science. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D.. Alumni Professor of His- 
tory. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE. Ph.D., Smith Professor of Gen- 
eral and Analytical Chemistry. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B., (State Geologist,) Lecturer on 
the Geology of North Carolina. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 

THOMAS HUME. D.D.. LL.D.. Professor of the English Language 
and Literature. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY. M.A., Professor of Modem Languages. 

EBEN ALEXANDER. Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C.E.. Professor of Mathematics. 

HENRY HORACE WILLIAMS. A.M., B.D., Professor of Philoso- 
phy. 

HENRY VAN PETERS WILSON, PH.D., Professor of Biology. 

KARL POMEROY HARRINGTON, A.M., Professor of the Latin 
Language and Literature. 

COLLIER COBB. A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN. Ph.B.. Professor of Pedagogy. 

FRANCIS KINGSLEY BALL, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry. 



OTHER INSTRUCTORS, AND ASSISTANTS. 
GEORGE STOCKTON WILLS. Ph.B., Instructor in English. 



20 INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS 

HERMAN HARRELL HORNE, A.M., Instructor in Modern Lan- 
guages. 
GEORGE PHINEAS BUTLER, B.E.. Instructor in Mathematics. 
FREDERICK LOUIS CARR, Ph.B., Instructor in Latin. 
GEORGE GULLETT STEPHENS, Instructor in Physical Culture. 
THOMAS CLARKE, Assistant in Chemistry. 
GEORGE HUGHES KIRBY, Assistant in Biology. 
WILLIAM RAND KENAN, Jr., S.B.. Assistant in Physics. 
ROBERT ERVIN COKER, Assistant in Biology. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



GREEK. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor BALL. 

1. Herodotus (selections). Homer (selections from the Iliad and 

the Odyssey). Reading at sight. Greek History. Four 

hours a toeek. 

Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Elective with Latin 1 as a requirement of candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2. Homer (selections from the Odyssey). Lysias (selected ora- 

tions). Plato (Apology and Crito). Euripides (Iphigenia 
among the Taurians). Reading at sight. Three hours a 
week. 

Elective with Latin 2 as a requirement of candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. Greek Prose Composition (elementary course). Translations 

from English into Greek. One hour a week. 

4. Thucydides (Book I.). Sophocles (Antigone). Private read- 

ing of Electra. One hour a week. 
Omitted in 1895-96. 

5. History of the early Greek Poets. Lectures, with required 

private reading. One hour {or more) a week. 

6. New Testament Greek. Critical and exegetical study of the 

Epistle of James. One hour a week. 

7. Greek Prose Composition (advanced course). Translations 

from English into Greek. Study of passages from classical 
Greek prose. One hour a week. 
Omitted in 1895-96. 



2 THE COLLEGE 

8. Homer (rapid reading of the Iliad or Odyssey). Two hows a 
lotek. 
Omitted in 1895-96. 



LATIN, 
v For Undergraduates. 

Mr. Carr. 
A. Livy (Books XXI. and XXII.). Horace (selections from the 
Satires, Epistles. Epodes and Odes). Composition. Read- 
ing at sight. Four hours a week. 

Required of candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Elective with Greek 1 as a requirement of candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Professor Harrington. 

2. Plautus (Trinummus. Captivi or Menaechmi). Terence (An- 

dria. Phormio or Adelphoe). Lectures on the Roman 
drama. Cicero (selected letters). Tacitus (Agricola and 
Germania). Special study of some Roman political and so- 
cial institutions. Three hours a week. 

Elective with Greek 2 as a requirement of candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

3. Theory and practice of teaching Latin. Review of portions 

of the Latin ordinarily studied in preparation for college. 
Suggestions as to books and methods. Application of 
theory to practice. Translation at sight. Oral reading 
of Latin without translation. Oru knur a week. 
Elective to students who have completed course 1. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

4. Pliny (selected letters). Specimens of other epistolary Latin. 

Lyric poets: early lyrists. Catullus, Horace (briefly), the 
decadence of Latin lyric poetry; Latin' hymns. Inves- 
tigation of special subjects. Tiro hours it week. 

Given alternately with course ."). 

Elective, in the Junior year, to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 23 

5. The Roman Elegiac Poets (selections from Catullus, Tibul- 

lus, Propertius and Ovid). Lectures on the origin and 

growth of the ancient elegy. Investigation of special 

subjects. Two hows a week. 

Omitted in 1895-96. 
Given alternately with course 4. 

Elective, in the Junior year, to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

6. Roman Philosophy. Lucretius (selections). Cicero (selections 

from the Academica, Tusculan Disputations. De Finibus, 
De Natura Deorurn). Seneca (De Providentia, De Tran- 
quillitate Animi, De VitaBeata). Leetm-es on the history 
and development of ancient philosophy. Original re- 
search. Two hours a week. 

Omitted in 1895-96. 
Given alternately with course 7. 

Elective, in the Senior year, to candidates for-the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

7. Roman Satire. Ennius, Lucilius and Varro (selected frag- 

ments). Horace (Satires I.. 10; II.. 1, 3 and 5). Persius. 
Juvenal. Seneca (Apoeolocyntosis). Petronius and Mar- 
tial (selections). Lectures on the origin and development 
of early satire. Original research. Two hours a ireelc. 

Given alternately with course 6. 

Elective, in the Senior year, to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor, of Philosophy. 

Courses 6 and 7 properly follow 4 and ~> respectively, but at 
the discretion of the instructor they may be elected togeth- 
er with a Junior course, or even, rarely, in advance of a 
Junior course. 

8. General Introduction to Roman Literature. Wilkins's Primer 

of Roman Literature, with supplementary lectures. Illus- 
trative class-room readings. A choice of the following 
courses of collateral reading : — 

a. B. C. 240-84: Plautus (Rudens), Terence (Phormio), Cor- 
nifici Rhetorica ad Herennium (Book IV.). 

b. B. C. 83-43: M. Terenti Varronis Res Rusticae (Book 
II.), Cicero (Philippic II.), Lucretius (Book V.). 

c. B. C. 43— A. D. 14 : Vergil (Eclogues, Georgics III., 440- 
5(i(i. and IV.), Horace (Epistles II. ,1), Livy (Book I.), 



24 THE COLLEGE 

d. A. D. 14-68 : Velleius Paterculus (Book II., chapters 41- 
131), Seneca (Hercules Furens), Lucan (Pharsalia, Book I.). 

e. A. D. 69-117 : Silius Italicus (Punica, Book V.), Statius 
(Silvae, Book I.), Tacitus (Annals, Book IV.). 

/. A. D. 117-211 : Suetonius (life of Augustus), Gellius(Noctes 
Atticae, Books V. and VI.), Appuleius (Metamorphoses IV., 
28 — VI., 24). Two hours a week. 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

9. Roman Topography. Lectures on the development of the 

city of Rome and the present condition of its ancient ruins, 
preceded by a glance at the geography of the Italian pe- 
ninsula. Illustration by maps, plans, photographs, etc. 
One hour a week {fall term). 

Omitted in 1895-96. 

Given alternately with course 10. 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

10. The Private Life of the Romans. Illustrated lectures on 

some of the more important and interesting customs and in- 
stitutions of Roman every-day life. One hour a week (fall 
term). ' 

Given alternately with course 9. 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

11. Latin Writing. Advanced exercises in the translation of 

English into Latin, with especial reference to style. One 

hour a week (spring term). 

Omitted in 1895-96. 

Given alternately with course 12. 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

12. Roman Epigraphy. The principles of the science, and the 

Interpretation of selected inscriptions. One hour a week 

(spring terms). 

Given alternately with course 11. 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

For Graduates. 

13. Latin Seminary. Critical study of some author, or literary 

work, or department of Roman literature. Two hours a 
week. 



COUBSES OF INSTRUCTION 25 

The members take turns with the instructor in the interpre- 
tation and discussion of the work in hand, and present peri- 
odically the result of their individual researches. The 
Seminary room contains facilities for the use of the mem- 
bers and a special library for consultation in connection 
with their work. During 1895-96, the Seminary will be 
occupied with Early Latin (the interpretation, and the 
grammatical, historical and literary study of the earliest 
Latin inscriptions and legal and literary fragments). 



GERMAN. 
For Undergraduates. 

Professor Toy and Mr. Hobne. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Composition. Storm (Im- 

mensee). Hauff (Das Kalte Herz). Heyse (L'Arrabbiata). 
Reading at sight. Three hours a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. 

Elective with Greek 2 or Latin 2 to candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and with French 1 or History 1 to can- 
didates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Professor Toy. 

2. Freytag(Die Journalisten). Schiller (DerGeisterseher). Fou- 

qu£ (Undine). Grammar. Composition. Reading at sight. 
Three hours a week. 

3. The German Drama (Lessing, Schiller and Goethe). Lectures. 

Theses. Two hours a week. 
Given alternately with French 3. 

For Graduates. 

4. Lessing's Dramatic Work. Lectures. Theses. Three hours a 

week. 

5. Faust (Part II.). Theses. One hour a week. 

Elective to students who have completed course 3. 
To be omitted in 1896-97. 

6. Gothic. Grammar (Braune). Ulfilas's Bible (Balg). One hour 

a week, 



26 THE COLLEGE 

FRENCH. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Toy and Mr. Horne. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Composition. French Prose 

(Super's French Reader 1 . Reading at sight. Threehownt n 

week. 

Elective with Greek 2 or Latin 2 to candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, with German 1 or History 1 to candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, and with 
German 2 or History 1 to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. 

Mr. Horxe. 

2. Halevy (L'Abbe Constantinl. About (La Mere de la Marquise). 

Greville (Le Moulin Frappier). Grammar. Composition. 
Reading at sight. Three hours a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor TOY. 

3. French Literature in the Nineteenth Century. Lectures. 

Theses. Reading at sight. Tiro hours a week. 
Given alternately with German 3. 

For Graduates. 

4. Rousseau's Educational Theory. Lectures. Theses. Tun 

hoars a week. 

The ability to read French fluently is necessary for admission 
to this course. 

5. Composition. Advanced course. One how a week. 



ENGLISH. 

For Undergraduates. 

Mr. Wills. 
1. Practical Rhetoric and Composition. Studies in A. S. Hill's 
Principles of Rhetoric. Frequent practice in composition 
in class-room exercises and in outside work on assigned 



COURSES OF IXSTKUCTION 27 

topics. Brief History of American Literature, with par- 
allel readings. Some work in the poetry of Scott and 
Byron. Three liours a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for a 
degree. 

Professor Hume. 

2. The Historical Accidence and Etymology of the English Lan- 

guage. Champney's History of English. Craik's English 
of Shakspere. Hume's Studies in the Style and Diction of 
the English Bible. Readings in Eighteenth Century Lit- 
erature. Addison's Coverlej- Papers. Gulliver's Travels. 
Pope's Satires and Epistles, and Rape of the Lock. Gold- 
smith. Practice in expository composition. 

Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for a 
degree. 

3. Essays and Orations. English Prose (Minto and Garnett). 

Wendell's Composition. Select Orations analyzed and dis- 
cussed: Burke's Conciliation with America, Macaulay on 
the Reform Bill, two of Webster's speeches, one of Cal- 
houn's, one of Pitt's with Fox's rejoinder, one of Glad- 
stone's. Class-room exercises and outside work on assigned 
subjects. One hour a wetk. 
Required, in the Senior year, of all candidates for a degree. 

4. Poetics. Gummere's text-book, with Chaucer, the Old Ballads, 

Spenser. Hales's Longer English Poems. Especial study of 
Tennyson: The Princess, In Memoriarn, The Idylls of the 
King. Critical theses. Pancoast's Literature. The drama 
studied in Shakspere's English Plays, Dowden's Primer 
of Shakspere. Hudson's Life, and Art of Shakspere. Two 
hours a week. 

5. The Philosophy of Literature. Stopford Brooke's Early Eng- 

lish Literature. Taine's History of English Literature. 
Bacon's Essays. Shakspere's Comedies and Tragedies. 
Marlowe and Ben Jonson._ Milton's Paradise Lest. The 
Novelists. Wordsworth. Browning. Theses. Two hours 
a week. 



28 THE COLLEGE 

6. Anglo-Saxon (elementary course). Sweet's or Cook's First 

Book. Earle's Philology. Two hours a week. 

Courses 6 and 7 are offered to supplement the work in His- 
torical Accidence and Etymology given in course 2 and to 
lay the foundation for advanced studies in philology and 
comparative grammar. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

7. Anglo-Saxon (advanced course). Middle English Phonology 

and Inflection. Skeat's Piers Plowman. The Wycliffite, 
Tyndale and later Bible Versions. Anglo-Saxon Poetry: 
Judith (Cook's Edition) and Beowulf (Harrison and 
Sharp's Edition). Skeat's Principles of Etymology, the 
Native Element. Two hours a week. 

For Graduates. 

Three of the following courses are offered each year: — 

8. Poetry and Criticism. A study of the art of poetry in general 

and of the principles of criticism. Aristotle's Poetics, Sid- 
ney's Apology for Poetry, Arnold's Essays, and Stedman's 
Nature and Elements of Poetry. Lessing's Laocoon. The 
forms of poetry, — epic, dramatic and lyric, — and metre. 

9. The Classical or Augustan Poets, a study of Restoration Lit- 

erature. The history of the reaction from classicism and 
of the Romantic revival with some study of contemporary 
and similar movements in other literatures. 

10. The Rise and Progress of the Drama from the Mystery Plays 

to the Middle of the Seventeenth Century. Toulmin 
Smith's York Miracle Plays, the Chester Collection, 
Peele's Edward I., Lyly's Endimion, Marlowe, Ben Jon- 
son, Middleton, Beaumont and Fletcher, Webster's Duch- 
ess of Malfi, Ford's Broken Heart, Massinger and others. 
Ward's Dramatic Literature, Symonds's Predecessors of 
Shakspere, and Schlegel's Lectures, the basis for discus- 
sions of the Classical and Romantic Schools. 
To be given in 1896-97. 

11. Seminary in Shakspere. The language, metrical forms, 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 29 

sources of plot and incident, construction of plays, com- 
parative study of his art. 

12. Victorian Poets. Special study of Tennyson, — his period, 

art, theory of life, relative position as a poet. Browning, — 
his philosophy, art, dramatic and lyric work. 

13. The History and Philosophy of Fiction. 

14. The Literary Study of the Bible. Critical survey of one 

or more of the following Books: the Psalms. Ruth, Esther, 
Ecclesiastes, Job, Selections from Isaiah, and the New 
Testament Books. Proverbs and other gnomic literature. 
Influence of the Bible on literary development and form. 
To be given in 1896-97. 

15. Anglo-Saxon Poetry. Beowulf. Elene. 

16. Anglo-Saxon. Comparative Grammar and Phonology. 
To be given in 1896-97. 

17. Anglo-Saxon. Northern Mythology. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Williams. 

1. Psychology. Lectures, with text-books. Theses. Three hours 

a week. 
Required, in the Junior year, of all candidates for a degree. 

2. Logic. Lectures, with text-books. Two hours a week. 

The aim of this course is to study Logic in life; therefore 
the system of Aristotle is not used. 

3. Ethics. Criticisms and Discussions. Two hours a week. 

The work is in the main to discuss and criticise freely. The 
students are urged to have opinions, to state them clearly 
and defend them sharply. 

The class meets at night, in the study of the Instructor. 

4. Philosophy. Lectures. Theses. Three hours a week. 

The instructor, following the lead of his own ideas, hopes to 



30 THE COI.LEOE 

give each student a deeper insight into, and a firmer grasp 
of. the forces that shape life. 
Elective, in the Senior year, with any study in a subject in 
which two or three years of connected work have already 
been completed, or with Physics 4. as a requirement of all 
candidates for a degree. 



For Graduates. 

5. Epistemology. Lectures. Theses. Three hours a week. 

The work offered is a study of the Critical Philosophy. This 
demands at least two years. The first year is given to the 
Prolegomena, and the Practical Reason, and to the works 
that prepared the way for Kant. The second year is given 
to Kritik der reinen Vernunft. 

Elective to students who have taken courses 3 and 4. 



HISTORY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor ALDERMAN. 

1. American History. Lectures, with text-books and collateral 

reading. The Colonization Period. Political and social 
history of the United States from 1787 to 1895. Text- 
books : Fiske's Critical Period. Walker's Making of the 
Nation, Wilson's Division and Reunion. Three hours a 
week. 

Professor Battle. 

2. English History. Lectures, with text-books and topical re- 

ports. Three Hours a week: 

This course gives a general survey of the field of English 
History, lectures being given, and parallel reading requir- 
ed, on such parts of the histories of France and other na- 
tions as are interlaced with that of England. Special at- 
tention is given to the great epochs wherein our political, 
industrial or religious institutions had their origin and 
development. 

3. Constitutional History and International Law.' Lectures, with 

texts-books and topical reports. Three hours a week. 

A preliminary study is made of the constitutional develop- 
ment of Athens and Sparta, and the Grecian leagues : 
those of Rome, and the greater nations, which were found- 
ed on the ruins of the Roman Empire. Special attention 



GOUKSES OF INSTRUCTION 31 



is then given to the constitutional development of Great 
Britain and hor colonies, and of the United States. Our 
federal constitution is critically studied and the great his- 
torical decisions of the Supreme Court on questions aris- 
ing thereunder carefully examined. This is followed by 
lectures on the leading principles of international law. 
Elective, in the Senior year, with Political and Social Science 
1 as a requirement of all candidates for a degree. 

4. The Constitutional and Political History of North Carolina. 

Lectures, with topical reports and theses. One hour a week. 

In this course no text-books are used. Lectures are given, 
and investigation into the Colonial Records, Acts and 
Journals of the Legislature. Public Documents, Manu- 
scripts, newspaper files and other printed matter, owned 
by the University and by the North Carolina Historical 
Society, is required. 

5. New Testament History. Lectures each Sunday morning at 

the instance of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

The New Testament texts in the Old and Revised Versions 
are critically examined, and the perfect correspondence 
between the sacred narratives and the contemporary his- 
tory of Rome and her Oriental Provinces is carefully ex- 
plained. 

This course cannot be counted toward a degree. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor Alderman! 

6. The United States during the Civil War and the Reconstruc- 

tion Period. 

The purpose of this course is to afford opportunity for inves- 
tigation and research into special phases of our history. 
It will be offered to men who have taken with credit 
courses 1, 2 and 3, or who are making historical study a spe- 
cialty in their work. 

Professor Battle. 

7. Historical Seminary. Original research into topics of the his- 

tory of North Carolina. Reports required weekly. 

Elective to graduates, and to special students who have passed 
courses 2 and 3 with honor, or have given proof of special 
fitness in the department of History. 

Other courses in History' will be prescribed for any students 
who desire advanced work. 



THE COLLEGE 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professors Winston and Battle. 

1. Principles of Political Economy and Sociology. Lectures, 

with text-books and parallel reading. Two hours a week. 

Elective, in the Senior year, with History 3 as a requirement 
of all candidates for a deg'ree. 

2. Current Questions. Seminary methods applied to the study 

of such questions as the Tariff, Money and Banking. Finan- 
cial Legislation, Divorce and Crime. Theses. Two hours 
a week. 
Elective to students who have completed course 1 with honor. 



MATHEMATICS. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Cain and Mr. Butler. 

1. Algebra (from Quadratics to Determinants). Plane and Solid 

Geometry. Four hours a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Conic Sections and High- 

er Plane Curves. Four hours a week. 

Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

Professor Cain. 

3. Solid Analytical Geometry. Differential and Integral Cal- 

culus. Three hours a week. 

Elective to students who have attained to grade 1 or grade 
2 in course 2. 

Mr. Butler. 

4. Projection Drawing. Surveying, with field work. Three 

hours a week. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 33 

For Graduates. 

Professor Cain. 
5. Pure or Applied Mathematics. In Pure Mathematics, select- 
ed chapters on Determinants, Imaginaries, Theory of Equa- 
tions, Higher Trigonometry, Quaternions. Advanced Cal- 
culus and its applications. In Applied Mathematics, Me- 
chanics of Engineering, including- Theoretical Mechanics, 
Hydraulics, Strength of Materials, Stresses in Bridge and 
Roof Trusses, Graphical Statics, and Theory of Arches and 
Retaining Walls. 

PHYSICS. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Gore. 

1. Physics. A general and rather elementary course. The 

fundamental facts of the subject presented, and the gen- 
eral laws illustrated by experiments. Two hours a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science, and of students in the Med- 
ical School. 

2. Physics. A general course, more advanced than course 1, 

with special attention to molecular physics. Lectures, 
with text-books. A series of experiments in physical 
measurements. Four hours a week. 
Required, in the Junior year, of all candidates for a degree. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. Electricity and Magnetism. Lectures, with text-books. Elec- 

trical measurements. Experimental study of dynamo ma- 
chines, electric motors, electric lighting, storage batter- 
ies, etc. Three hours a week. 

■I. Descriptive and Historical Astronomy. Three hours a week. 

This course is conducted as a branch of liberal education, 
but enough mathematics is included to give accuracy to 
the study. 



34 THE COLLEGE 

Elective, in the Senior year, with any study in a subject in 
which two or three years of connected work have already 
been completed, or with Philosophy 4, as a requirement of 
all candidates for a degree. 

5. Mathematical Theory of Electricity. I'wo hows a week. 

6. Heat in its Relations to Mechanical Energy. Two hours a week. 



CHEMISTRY. 
For Undergraduates. 

Professor Venable. 

1. Experimental Chemistry. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hours a week. 

This course covers the general principles of Chemistry as 
brought out by a study of the elements and their com- 
pounds, and includes a brief preliminary treatment of Or- 
ganic Chemistry. The students taking this course must 
perform in the laboratory a given number of experiments, 
thus familiarizing themselves with the characteristics and 
behavior of the various substances lectured upon. 

Required, in the Sophomore year, of candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Biology 2 or Geology 
2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2. Industrial Chemistry. Lectures. The applications of Chem- 

istry to the arts and industries. Three hours a week. 

This course includes metallurgy, glass-making, pottery, 
foods, clothing, building-materials, explosives, photogra- 
phy, etc. The latter half of the spring term is devoted to 
course 3. 

3. Agricultural Chemistry. Lectures. Three hmtrs a week (spring 

term). 

This course includes the chemistry of the plant and the soil, 
and the discussion of plant, food, etc. Many specimens 
have been collected in the Industrial Museum to illustrate 
courses 2 and 3. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Biology 2 or Geology 
2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science. 

Assistant Professor Baskerville. 

4. Qualitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Two hours a week. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 35 



The student is familiarized with the more common elements 
and their reactions, and is trained to detect the various 
constituents of minerals and similar substances. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Biology 2 or Geology 
2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science. 

5. Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Laboratory work. Three 

or fixe hours a week. 

This course is intended to give the student a thorough 
grounding in analytical methods and manipulations. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor Venable and Assistant Professor Baskerville. 

ft. Organic Chemistry. Lectures. Two hours a week. 

In this course as full a study as possible is made of the hy- 
drocarbons and their derivatives. 

7. Theoretical and Historical Chemistry. Lectures. Two hours 

a week. 

The lectures in the fall term cover the theories of Chemis- 
try ; in the spring term they treat of the historical devel- 
opment of the science. 

8. Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Three or five hours 

a week. 

The student in this course is led further into the study and 
practice of analytical methods. The work may take any 
special direction desired by him, fitting him to be an agri- 
cultural chemist, iron chemist, manufacturing chemist, 
physician, druggist, or teacher of chemistry. Encourage- 
ment is given to the student to make original researches. 

9. Toxicology and Urinary Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 

work. Two hours a week. 

This course is given during the spring term to medical stu- 
dents and others who may desire it. 



36 THE COLLEGE 

BIOLOGY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor WILSON. 

1. Elements of Physiology. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hour* a week {fall torn). 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Philosophy or Bachelor of Science. 

2. General Biology. Lectures, with laboratory work. Tliree 

Iwurs a week. 

The laboratory work embraces the study of a number of 
typical animals and plants, and cell structure. In the lec- 
tures the forms to be studied are briefly described, and the 
biological principles which they illustrate are discussed. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Chemistry 1 or Geol- 
ogy 2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy, and with 
Chemistry 4 or Geology 2 as a requirement of candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

3. Systematic Botany of the Flowering Plants. Reading, labor- 

atory, and field work. Tiro lwurs a week (spring term). 

Representatives of the several orders of Phanerogams art- 
studied, and each student is required to analyse, independ- 
ently, a number of plants. 

4. Mammalian Anatomy. Laboratory course. Three hours a 

week [fall U 1711 . 

The anatomy of a single mammal is studied in detail, and a 
useful basis is thus acquired for further work in Compara- 
tive Anatomy. Histology, or Physiology. 

5. Vertebrate Embryology. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hours a week [fall U «n . 

In this outline of Vertebrate Embryology, the segmentation 
of the ovum and the formation of the germ layers are 
studied in echinoderm. amphibian, and teleost eggs : while 
the development of the characteristic vertebrate organs 
is worked out on chick embryos. 

6. Vertebrate Histology. Lectures, with laboratory work. 'Hirer 

hours a wi V [spring '< rm \. 

In the laboratory microscopic preparations illustrating the 
structure of the principal tissues and organs of the verte- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 37 



brate body are made and studied. In this and the preced- 
ing course, a knowledge of elementary microscopic tech- 
nique is acquired, the student becoming familiar with the 
processes of section-cutting, staining, mounting, etc. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

1. Microscopic Technique. Three hours a week (fall term). 

In the previous courses, an elementary knowledge of mi- 
croscopic technique will have been acquired. In this 
course, the effort is made to give a comprehensive and 
thorough training in the subject, such as will fit the stu- 
dent for independent work. 

8. Comparative . Anatomy of Vertebrates. 27»w hours a week 

(spring term). 

It is the object of this course to supplement the knowledge 
of vertebrate structure acquired in the earlier courses. 
For this purpose additional representative vertebrates are 
studied in the laboratory, and a text-book is read. 

9. Invertebrate Moi-]5hology. Three hours a week. 

The structure of representatives of the various invertebrate 
groups is here worked out. In some cases the develop- 
ment is followed. A text-book is read. 

10. Research Course in Zoology. 

The aim in this course is not to cover ground, but to initiate 
the student into the method of conducting an original in- 
vestigation in Zoology. A special problem is assigned, 
literature bearing on the question provided, and any new 
results of interest are published. 



GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Cobb. 

1. Physiography. Lectures, with recitations. Tarr's Physic- 

al Geography. Three hours a week (spring term). 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy or Bachelor of Science. 

2. General Geology, including Mineralogy. Lectures and reci- 

tations, with work in the field and in the laboratory. Three 
hours a week. 



38 THE COLLEGE 

The lectures deal with the more easily explained geological 
phenomena. Reference is made to LeConte's Elements of 
Geology. The laboratory work is devoted to the study of 
about fifty important mineral species, and includes also a 
study of disintegration and erosion, structure of the frag- 
mental rocks, metamorphism. the relation of life to rocks, 
and the preservation of organic remains. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Chemistry 1 or Biol- 
ogy 2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy, and with 
Chemistry 4 or Biology 2 as a requirement of candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

3. Determinative Mineralogy. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Dana's text-book of Mineralogy. Two hours a week (fall 
term). 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

4. General Critical Geology. Lectures, with work in the field 

and in the laboratory. Dana's Manual of Geology. Theses. 
Books for reference : Lyell's Principles of Geology and 
Geikie's Text-book of Geology. Three hours a week. 

This course treats of the history of Geology. The various 
geological theories are considered critically. Problems 
are worked out in the field and in the laboratory. Theses 
must be completed by the first day of May. * 

Given alternately with courses 5 and (i. 

5. Economic Geology. Lectures, with work in the field and in 

the laboratory. The general features and formation of 

ore deposits followed by a description of the deposits of the 

ores of iron, copper, lead, zinc, silver, gold, and the lesser 

metals, with especial reference to North America and to 

the economic geology of North Carolina. Three hours a 

week (fall term). 

Omitted in 1896-91. 

Courses 5 and 6 are given alternately with course 4. 
Elective to students who have completed courses 2 and 3 and 
a course in Chemistry. 

6. Economic Geology. Discussion of the distribution and occur- 

rence of coal, petroleum, natural gas, asphalt, building- 
stone, water-supply, salines, and minor minerals, Three 
hours a week (spring term). 
Omitted in 1896-97, 



COUB8E6 OF INSTRUCTION 39 

Courses 5 and 6 are given alternately with course 4. 
Elective to students who have completed courses 2 and 3 and 
a course in Chemistry. 

7. Advanced Geological Field-work and Special Research. Prob- 

lems assigned individually and work adapted to the pro- 
fessional needs of the student. Seminary once a week, and 
individual conferences. Three hours a week. 

This course may be taken with advantage in successive 
years. 

8. Summer Course. Physical and Structural Geology, including 

Mineralogy. Daily lectures, with work in the laboratory, 

and in the field round King's Mountain, North Carolina. 

This course counts three hours a week for one term. 
Omitted in 1896. 

9. Summer Course. Advanced Geological Field-work and Spe- 

cial Research. Study of Deep River and Wadesboro areas 
of the Newark rocks. 

This course begins at Chapel Hill, June 3, 1896, and contin- 
ues through the summer. 

In addition to the above courses, short series of lectures are 
from time to time given to the students of geology by 
members of the North Carolina Geological Survey. The 
lectures for 1895-96 include the following : — 

The Geology of the Coastal Plain. Professor Holmes. 

The Iron Ores of North Carolina. The Occurrence of Gold 
in North Carolina. Mr. H. B. C. Nitze. 

The Building-stones of North Carolina. Corundum. Mr. 
J. V. Lewis. 



PEDAGOGY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Alderman. 

1. The Science of Education. Lloyd Morgan's Psychology for 

Teachers, and Rein's Pedagogics. Two hours a week {fall 

term). 

The aim of this course is to develop a consistent body of ed- 
ucational doctrine for the guidance of teachers, 



40 THE COLLEGE 

2. The Art of Teaching. This course is devoted to the study of 

the teaching process with its related problems of govern- 
ment and discipline. Lectures by the instructor, text- 
books and readings : De Garmo's Essentials, Reports of 
Committees of Ten and Fifteen, Herbart Year Books. 
The bulk of the work will consist of practical exercises in 
teaching definite subjects and the study of educational val- 
ues. Turn hours a week [spring term). 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. General History of Education. The Culture Conditions and 

Educational Doctrines of the Past. Williams' History of 
Modern Education, Munroe's Educational Ideal. Two hours 
a week (full term). 

4. Philosophy of Education. Rosencranz's Philosophy of Educa- 

tion. Discussion of special educational topics and the so- 
cial aspects of education in the United States and in North 
Carolina. Pedagogical theses. Tiro hours a week (spring 
term). 

5. The Study of Childhood in Transforming Modern Methods of 

Studying and Teaching Educational Science. 2>o hours a 
week. 

The aim of this course is to investigate minutely the attitude 
of society toward the child in ancient and modern life, as 
a basis for future study in Paidology. 

This is a course of research. It is proposed to embody the 
results in printed theses. 

Given alternately with course 6. 

fi. Herbartian Pedagogy. Two hours a week. 

The attempt is made in this course to investigate the Her- 
bartian movement in Germany and in the United States. 
The works of Rein, Stoy, Ziller, Lange and others are 
studied. 

Given alternately with course 5. 



COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES. 



The College provides three courses of study, of four years each, 
leading respectively to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), 
Bachelor of Philosophy (Ph.B.), and Bachelor of Science (S.B.). 
Required and elective studies amounting to a, total of fifteen hours a 
week: (Ire prescribed, in each course, for all candidates for a degree. 
The courses are as follows: — 

I. BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Freshman Year. 

Required -Studies: Greek 1; Latin 1: English 1; Mathemat- 
ics 1. 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies: English 2: Mathematics 2; one study 
from the following group: Greek 2. Latin 2: one study from the 
following group: Chemistry 1. Geology 2, Biology 2: one study 
from the following group: Greek 2. Latin 2, German 1, French 1. 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: Philosophy 1: Physics 2; one study from 
the following group: Greek, Latin, German. French, English. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except Physics 1 
and Geology 1. 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies: English 3; one study from the following 
group: Political and Social Science 1, History 3; one study in a 
subject in which two or three years of connected work have already 



42 THE COLLEGE 

been completed, or one study from the following group: Philoso- 
phy 4. Physics 4. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except English 
6 and those studies included in the list of work for Freshmen and 
Sophomores in any course leading to a degree. 

II. BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies: English 1; Mathematics 1: Biology 1; 
Geology 1; one subject from the following group: Greek 1. Latin 1. 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies: English 2: Mathematics 2: one study 
from the following group: Greek 2. Latin 2: one study from the 
following group: German 1. French 1. History 1: one study from 
the following group: Chemistry 1, Biology 2. Geology 2. 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: Philosophy 1 : Physics 2. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except Physics 1. 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies: English 3: one study from the following 
group: Political and Social Science 1 . History 3: one study in a 
subject in which two or three years of connected work have already 
been completed, or one study from the following group: Philoso- 
phy 4, Physics 4. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except English 
fi and those studies included in the list of work for Freshmen and 
Sophomores in any course leading to a degree. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 



III. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies: German 1; English 1; Mathematics 1; 
Physics 1; Biology 1; Geology 1. 

: 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies: English 2; Mathematics 2; Chemistry 1; 
one study from the following group: German 2, French 1, History 
1; one study from the following group: Chemistry 4, Biology 2, 
Geology 2. 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: Philosophy 1; Physics 2; one study from 
the following group: German, French, Mathematics, Chemistry, 
Biology, Geology. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College. 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies: English 3; one study from the following 
group: Political and Social Science 1, History 3; one study in a 
subject in which two or three years of connected work have 
already been completed, or one study from the following group: 
Philosophy 4, Physics 4. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except English 
6 and those studies included in the list of work for Sreshmen and 
Sophomores in any course leading to a degree. 

GRADES OF SCHOLARSHIP. 

At the end of every' term, or upon the completion of a subject, 
students are assigned, according to their proficiency, to one of five 
grades of scholarship, designated respectively by the figures 1, 2, 
3, 4, and 5. Grade 5 denotes failure. 



H THE COLLEGE 

An instructor may exclude from a course any student who, in his 
judgment, neglects his work. 

DEGREES. 

A student is not recommended for a degree until he has passed 
in all studies prescribed for that degree, and in the required num- 
ber of elective studies. 

Degrees with Distinction. 

A member of the Senior Class is recommended by the Fac- 
ulty either for an ordinary degree or for a degree with distinction in 
one of three grades. 

The conditions under which a candidate is recommended for a 
degree with distinction are as follows: — 

If he has attained to grade 2 in one half of all work for four 
years, he is recommended for a degree cum laude. 

If he has attained to grade 2 in five sixths of all work for four 
years, or grade 1 in one half of all work for four years, he is recom- 
mended for a degree magna cum laude. 

If he has attained to grade 1 in five sixths of all work for four 
years, he is recommended for a degree summa cum laude. 

Commencement Parts. 

Every member of the Senior Class is required to write a thesis 
or an oration for graduation. All orations are delivered May 1, 
in a preliminary contest, before a committee of judges, who select 
for the Commencement Programme as many as six. if deemed 
worth y. 

HONORS. 

Honors are awarded by the Faculty to those members of the 
Junior, Sophomore or Freshman Class who have completed with 
great credit all work of the year. Honors are of two grades — 
Honors, and Highest Honors. 



COtJBSES FOB STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOB A DEGBEE 45 

The conditions under which Honors and Highest Honors are 
awarded are as follows: — 

Honors are awarded to those students who have attained to grade 
2 in four fifths of all courses for the year, or who have attained to 
grade 1 in one half of all courses for the year. 

Highest Honors are awarded to those students who have attained 
to grade 1 in four fifths of all courses for the year. 

SPECIAL CERTIFICATES. 

A special certificate is granted to a student who has creditably 
completed, in any department, all work required for a degree to- 
gether with other elective work in the same department. 

COURSES FOR STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOR A 
v DEGREE. 

Three courses of study, each extending over a period of two 
years, are suggested to students who are unable to complete any 
course leading to a degree. These brief courses are intended to 
include subjects that have a direct practical value for young men 
intending to be teachers, lawyers, or physicians. Studies amount- 
ing to a total of fifteen hours a week are recommended. The courses 
are as follows: — 

I. For those intending to teach. 

First Yeae: Greek, Latin, German, French, English, Mathe- 
matics, Elementary Physics, Physiology, Physiography. 

Second Year: Greek, Latin, German, French, English, Philos- 
ophy, History, Constitutions and Laws of the United States and of 
North Carolina, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geolo- 
gy, History and Science of Education. 

II. For those intending to practice law. 

First Yeab: Latin, English, History, Mathematics, Physics, 
Chemistry, Geology. 



46 THE COLLEGE 

Second Yeak: Latin, English, Philosophy, History and Histor- 
ical Research, Constitutions of England, of the United States, and 
of North Carolina, Political Economy, Mathematics. 

III. For those intending' to practice medicine. 

First Year: Greek, Latin, German, French, English, Mathe- 
matics, Elementary Physics, Physiology, Physiography. 

Second Year: Greek, Latin, German, French, English, Chem- 
istry, Practical Biology, Geology. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



ADMISSION. 



Graduates of the University of North' Carolina and of other 
universities and colleges of good standing are. on application to 
the Faculty, ordinarily admitted to advanced courses of instruc- 
tion, free of charge for tuition. An applicant 'for admission, unless 
a graduate of the University of North Carolina, is required to pre- 
sent a certificate of scholarship and character, or his diploma, if 
he has a degree. 

Graduate Students are admitted to advanced courses in the Col- 
lege as well as to those courses especially provided for them. They 
enjoy the same privileges with other members of the University. 

Applications for admission to the higher courses of study should 
be presented at the beginning of the College year. 

DEGREES. 

The University offers to Graduate Students advanced work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts (A.M.), Master of Phi- 
losophy (Ph.M.). Master of Science (S.M.), and Doctor of Philos- 
ophy (Ph.D.). 

Candidacy. 

Any Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of Philosophy, or Bachelor of 
Science, of the University of North Carolina may become a candi- 
date for the corresponding Master's degree, or for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

A Graduate Student frcm another university or college who 
wishes to become a candidate for an advanced degree, but has not 
completed undergraduate courses required for a Eachelor's de- 
gree in this University, must make good such deficiency before his 
5 



48 THE COLLEGE 

candidacy for the advanced degree can be accepted. A candidate 
must make written application to the Faculty and state three 
branches of study, a major and two minors, in which he wishes to 
prepare himself for the desired degree. Every candidate for an 
advanced degree must submit to the approval of the Faculty a 
thesis on some question connected with his major subject. The 
thesis must be submitted on or before the first day of May in the 
last year of study for the degree. 

An application for an advanced degree must be accompanied by 
the registration fee of ten dollars. 

The Degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Philosophy, and 
Master of Science. 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts, Master of Philoso- 
phy, or Master of Science, who has not received the corresponding 
Bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina, is re- 
quired to pursue, in residence at the University, at least three 
courses of study of a minimum of fifteen hours a week, for one 
College year. A candidate who has received a Bachelor's degree 
from the University of North Carolina may be granted the corres- 
ponding Master's degree after at least two years of study, as a 
Non-resident Student, in work prescribed by the Faculty: but he 
must satisfy the Faculty by examination, or by his thesis, that he 
is worthy of recommendation for the degree. 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must include either 
Greek or Latin in his graduate studies. 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is required 
to pursue, in residence at the University, a prescribed course of 
advanced study and research for at least two College years. These 
requirements of residence and study are entirely secondary. The 
degree is conferred not simply for faithful study in a determinate 
field of work for a prescribed period, but because of high attain- 
ment in a special branch of learning, which the candidate must 
have manifested not only by examinations, but by a thesis which 



49 



gives evidence of independent research, and contributes to knowl- 
edge. The thesis must be accepted before the candidate may be 
admitted to examination. The examinations are both written and 
oral. They demand a minute knowledge of some special field of 
work as well as a general acquaintance with the department of 
learning in which the candidate offers himself for the degree. 



PECUNIARY AID AND EXPENSES. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Holt Medal in Mathematics. (Established in 1874.) A 
gold medal is offered by J. Allen Holt and Martin H. Holt, the 
Principals of Oak Ridge Institute, to that student who shall take 
the highest rank in Mathematics 3. No student will be recom- 
mended for the medal unless he attain to grade 1 or grade 2. 

The Hume Medal in English Composition. (Established in 
1890.) A gold medal is offered by Professor Thomas Hume to that 
member of the Senior Class who shall present the best essay or 
thesis on the occasion of his graduation. 

The Mangum Medal in Oratory. (Established in 1878.) The 
Misses Mangum, of Orange County, offer in memory of their 
father, Willie Person Mangum, a gold medal to that membe'. - of the 
Senior Class who f.hall deliver the best oration at Commencement. 

The Representative's Medal. (Established in 1881.) The 
Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies offer a gold medal 
to that member of either Society who shall deliver the best oration 
in the annual Oratorical Contest between representatives of the 
two Societies on the day before Commencement. 

The Hill Prize in History. (Established in 1890.) Books 
relating to North Carolina, to the value of fifteen dollars, are offered 
by John Sprunt Hill, of New York City, a graduate of the Class of 
1889, for the best thesis on some phase of the history of North Car- 
olina, the subject to be selected by the Professor of History. 

The Kerr Prize in Geology' or Mineralogy. (Established 
in 1889.) A prize of fifty dollars is offered by William H. Kerr, of 
Baltimore, Md., in memory of his father, Professor Washington 
Caruthers Kerr, to any undergraduate or graduate student, for the 
i best thesis containing original work in the geology or mineralogy 
of North Carolina. 



SCHOLAESHIPS 51 

The Tolman Prize in Greek. (Established in 1894.) A prize 
of ten dollars is offered by Herbert Gushing- Tolman. Professor of 
Greek 1893-94, to that member of the Sophomore Class who shall 
present the best rendering- into English of selected passages of 
Greek not previously read. 

The Worth Prize in Philosophy. (Established in 1883.) 
David Gaston Worth, of the Class of 1853, will have printed the 
best thesis submitted by a student in Philosophy 4. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Cameron Scholarships. (Established in 1892.) The 
heirs of Paul Collins Cameron have founded, in his memory, ten 
scholarships of the value of sixty dollars each. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies' 
Scholarships. (Established in 1893.) The Dialectic and Philan- 
thropic Literary Societies of the University have founded two 
scholarships of the value of sixty dollars each, the recipients of 
which shall give assistance in the Library. 

The Moore Scholarships. (Established in 1881.) Bartholo- 
mew Figures Moore, of Raleigh, bequeathed five thousand dollars, 
the interest of which shall be devoted to paying the tuition of stu- 
dents. 

The Mary Ann Smith Scholarships. (Established in 1891.) 
Miss Mary Ann Smith has bequeathed thirty-seven thousand dol- 
lars for the foundation of scholarships, the number of scholarships 
to be determined by the amount of the income. 

The Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarships. (Established in 
1885.) Miss Mary Ruffin Smith bequeathed to the University, in 
memory of her brother, Dr. Francis Jones Smith, a valuable tract 
of land in Chatham County, of about fourteen hundred and sixty 
acres, known as Jones's Grove. The will provides that ''the rents 
of the land, or the interest of the purchase money, if sold, shall be 
used to pay the tuition of such poor students as the Faculty shall 
appoint," 



52 THE COLLEGE 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1392.) Mrs. Mary 
Sprunt Wood, of Wilmington, has founded, in memory of her late 
husband. Dr. Thomas Fanning Wood, a scholarship of the value of 
sixty dollars. 

The Speight Scholarships. (Established in 1895.) The late 
Mrs. Mary Sheppard Speight has bequeathed ten thousand dol- 
lars to the University. The income shall be used to pay the tui- 
tion of needy students: but if tuition is ever made free, the income 
shall be used toward paying the salaries of the professors. 

FREE TUITION. 

By an act of the Legislature in 1887. free tuition is given, in the 
College, to candidates for the ministry, to the sons of ministers, to 
young men under bodily infirmity, and to young men preparing to 
be teachers. 



LOAN FUNDS. 

The Deems Fuxd. (Established in 1879.) A fund of six hun- 
dred dollars was established by Dr. Charles Force Deems, late pas- 
tor of the Church of the Strangers. New York City, formerly a 
Professor in the University, in memory of his son. Lieutenant 
Theodore Disosway Deems. In 1881 the fund was greatly enlarg- 
ed, through the munificence of Mr. William H. Vanderbilt, by a 
gift of ten thousand dollars, "as an addition to the Deems Fund, to 
be loaned to indigent students of the University." 

The Lake Fund. (Established in 1895.) A fund of three hun- 
dred dollars has been established by Mr. Henry Steers Lake, of 
the Class of 1898, to be used, at the discretion of the President, in 
helping students. Mr. Lake has added three hundred dollars to 
this fund during the present year. 



EXPENSES. 

Every effort is made to reduce to the lowest point the necessary 



ASSIGNMENT OF BOOMS 53 

expenses of an education at the University. The annual charges 
are as follows : — 

Tuition fee $60.00 

Registration fee 10.00 

Medical fee 5.00 

Gymnasium fee 2.50 

Library fee 4.00 

Total $81.50 

Students taking courses in the laboratories are charged a small 
fee for materials. The library fee is two dollars for members of 
the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies. A schedule 
of prices of rooms afforded by the University may be had of the 
Bursar. The rooms are not furnished. The price of board is from 
six to thirteen dollars a month. The entire annual expenses 
need not exceed three hundred dollars, and they may be reduced 
to two hundred dollars. 

ASSIGNMENT OF ROOMS. 

Rooms for 1890-97 will be assigned on Saturday, September 5, 
1896, and on Wednesday January 6, 1897. Students who are at 
the University on these dates will have a choice of rooms accord- 
ing to regulations which will then be announced. 



THE COLLEGE. 



BEatTIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

I. Admission into the Freshman Class. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are admitted 
by examination or by certificate. Examinations for admission are 
held in September and in January. The University admits, with- 
out examinations, students with certificates from certain schools 
in the State whose courses of study and methods of instruction are 
approved by the Faculty. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

The requirements for admission into the Freshman Class in the 
course leading' to the degree of Bachelor of Arts are as follows: — 

1. GREEK. Three Books of Xenophon's Anabasis, with ques- 
tions on the more usual forms and constructions: simple narrative 
in English, based upon Xenophon's Anabasis, to be translated into 
Greek. 

The following books are recommended as useful in preparation 
for the examination in Greek: White's Beginner's Greek Book. 
Collar and Daniel's Greek Composition, Goodwin and White's 
Anabasis (revised edition, with vocabulary). 

The pronunciation of Greek as given in White's Beginner's Greek 
Book is recommended. 

2. Latin. Two Books of Caesar's Gallic War: four Orations 
of Cicero: six Books of Vergil's Aeneid: Latin Grammar, includ- 
ing prosody: simple narrative in English, based upon the prose 
read, to be translated into Latin. 

Instructors should teach the Roman method of pronouncing Latin. 

3. English. Grammar: Elements of Rhetoric: English Litera- 
ture. Every candidate is required to write a short composition, 
correct in spelling, punctuation, grammar, and division into para- 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION' 55 

graphs, upon one of several subjects announced at the time of the 
examination. In 1896-97 and 1897-98. the subjects will be chosen 
from one or more of the following' works: — 

Shakspere's Merchant of Venice. Milton's Comus, Irving's Alham- 
bra, Macaulay's Essay on Milton, Scott's Ivanhoe, and Lady of the 
Lake, Long-fellow's Evangeline, Webster's First Bunker Hill Ora- 
tion. De Foe's History of the Plague in London. 

The candidate is expected to read all the books named, and to 
give evidence in his composition that he is acquainted with the 
important parts of the book from which the subject of his compo- 
sition is taken, and with the life of the author. 

The following books are recommended as useful in preparation 
for the examination in English: Whitney's, Bains, Longmans' or 
Salmon's English Grammar: Clark's Smaller Practical Rhetoric 
or D. J. Hill's Rhetoric: Brooke's or Gillam's English Literature. 
Swinton's Studies in English Literature, Pancoast's Introduction 
to English Literature. Lockwood's Lessons in English is useful 
for review. Some annotated editions of the prose and poetry 
should be carefully studied. 

4. History. The histories of Greece. Rome, and the United 
States. 

The following books are recommended as useful in preparation 
for the examination in History: Oman's History of Greece, Allen's 
Short History of the Roman People. Chambers's or Barnes's History 
of the United States. 

5. Mathematics. Arithmetic: Algebra (to Equations of the 
Second Degree'.. 

Students are advised to complete a good elementary Algebra, and 
to study an advanced Algebra as far as Quadratic Equations, be- 
fore offering themselves for the examination in Algebra. The fol- 
lowing books are recommended as useful in preparation for the 
examination in Mathematics: Robinson's Practical Arithmetic, 
Lock and Scott's Arithmetic. Wells's, Newcomb's or Wentworth's 
Algebra. 

The Degrees of Bachelor of Philosophy and Bachelor of Science. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in the course 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy may omit the ex- 
amination in Greek. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in the course 



56 THE COLLEGE 

leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science may omit the exam- 
inations in Greek and in Latin. 

Times and Places of Examinations. 

All candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in any 
course leading to a degree must assemble in Gerrard Hall at 9 
A.M. on Wednesday. Thursday, and Friday, September 2, 3, and 4. 
They will there be assigned to rooms for examination. 

Order of Examinations. 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, September 2, 3, 4. 
i) A.M. Candidates assemble in Gerrard Hall. 
10 A.M. Examinations in Greek. Latin, Mathematics. 
3 P.M. Examinations in English, History. 

Candidates for admission in January will present themselves at 
the President's office, in the South Building, where appointments 
for examinations will be arranged. 

Arrangements have been made with certain schools in the State 
whereby examinations for admission may be held in May also, at 
the schools. 

II. Admission to Advanced Standing'. 

A candidate for advanced standing may be admitted to the 
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Class, with or without complete exam- 
ination. He is subject not only to the examinations required of 
candidates for admission into the Freshman Class, but to special 
examinations both in all the required studies already pursued by 
the Class which he desires to enter, and in as many elective studies 
as would have been required of him as a member of that Class. 
When satisfied with the apparent fitness of the candidate, the ex- 
amining committee may, in spite of his deficiencies in some studies, 
admit him to an advanced Class; but a candidate so admitted is not 
recommended for a degree until his deficiencies are made good. 
The examining committee may accept also, with proper restric- 
tions, the official report of work satisfactorily completed at a col- 



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE REMOVAL OF CONDITIONS 57 

lege or university of good standing in place of an examination 
upon such previous work. Thisarrangement is intended to obviate 
the necessity of long and minute examinations of the entire course, 
and to substitute in place of examinations here, previous examina- 
tions passed satisfactorily at institutions of high standing. Every 
case is decided on its own merits: and the candidate is assigned to 
that Class for which he appears to be qualified. 

A candidate for advanced standing should present himself for 
examination on the same days and at the same hours with candi- 
dates for admission into the Freshman Class. 

III. Examinations for the Removal of Conditions. 

A student who has failed to pass the examination in any College 
study may not take further work in that department until he make 
good his deficiency by a special examination or by taking the study 
a second time. 

Examinations for the removal of conditions will be held in the 
respective lecture-rooms of the instructors. 

Order of Examinations. 

Monday, August 31. 
10 a.m. Examinations in Physics, Chemistry. 

Tuesday, September 1. 
10 a.m. Examinations in Latin, Geology. 

Wednesday, September 2. 
10 a.m. Examinations in English, Biology. 

Thursday. September 3. 
10 A.M. Examinations in French, Plilosophy, Mathematics. 

Friday, September !>. 
10 a.m. Examinations in Greek, History. 

Saturday, September S. 
10 a.m. Examinations in German, History, Pedagogy. 



58 THE COLLEGE 

IV. Admission of Optional Students. 

r A person who desires to take up an optional course of study, 
without becoming a candidate for a degree, may be admitted 
into the College without examination, upon the presentation of 
a certificate from the college or university last attended, or by 
otherwise satisfying the Faculty that he is qualified to pursue the 
desired course. A candidate so admitted is called an Optional Stu- 
dent. He enjoys the same privileges with other members of the 
College, and is subject to the same regulations. 

Optional students are advised to elect work from one of the three 
shorter courses of study suggested on pages 45 and 46; but he may, 
if properly qualified, pursue a special line of work in any depart- 
ment. 



REGISTRATION. 

All students are expected to present themselves for registration 
on Thursday or Friday, September 3 or 4, 1S96, and on Wednesday, 
January 6, 1S97, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., at the 
office of the Registrar. 

A student who presents himself for registration after the dates 
and times named cannot be admitted except by special permission, 
in writing, from the Executive. 

All students are futher expected to present themselves for en- 
rollment at the first exercise in their several studies, required and 
elective. 



STUDENTS. 

Graduates. 

NAME. TEAE. RESIDENCE. 

Butler. George Phineas, First Year. Chapel Hill. 

B.E. (University of Georgia) 1894. Instructor in Mathematics. Mathe- 
matics, Physics. 

Carr, Frederick Louis, First Year, Castoria. 

Pb.B. 1895. Instructor in Latin. Latin, Political and Social Science. 

Cheek, John Morgan, First Year., Highgate. 

A3. 1893. Latin, Philosophy, Pedagogy. 

Currie, Daniel Johnson, Second Year. Chapel Hill. 

A.B. 1889. Greek, Latin, English, History. 
Darden, William Edward. First Year. Kinston. 

A.B. 1893. Latin, English, Pedagogy. 

Dyer, Algernon Sidney, First- Year. Hollis, Me. 

A.B. (Bowdoin College) 1891. English, History. 

Home. Herman Harrel, First Year, Clayton. 

A.B. and A.M. 1895. Instructor in Modern Lauguages. Greek, Philosophy. 

Kenan. William Rand, First Year, Wilmington. 

S.B. 1894. Physics, Chemistry, Geology. 

Mattocks, John Edward, First Year, Pollocksville. 

S.B. 1895. Philosophy, Biology, Geology. 

Moore, John Allen, First Year, Oaks. 

A.B. 1895. Philosophy, History, Political and Social Science. 

Schubert, Louis Hector, First Year, Chapel Hill. 

A.B. and B.D. (Nashotah College, Wis.) 1885. German, English, History. 

Wills, George Stockton, Second Year, Greensboro. 

Ph.B. 1889. Instructor in English. French, English, History. 

Wilson, Thomas James, Jr., Second Year, Chapel Hill. 

A.B. 1894. Latin. 



Senior Class. 



NAME. 


COURSE . 


RESIDENCE. 


Allsbrook, Richard Gold, 


Arts, 


Scotland Neck. 


Aston, McKay Bernard, 


Arts, 


Greeneville,Tenn 


Bahnson, Frederic Fries, 


Philosophy, 


Salem. 



60 



THE COLLEGE 



Batchelor, Van Astor, Arts. 

Braswell, Thomas Pleasant. Jr.. Philosophy, 

Brem, Walter Vernon. Jr.. Science. 

Briles. Charles Walter. Letters. 

Bryson, Daniel Rice. Philosophy. 

Canada. John William, Arts. 

Carr. Edward Parrish, Arts. 

Clarke, Thomas, Science. 

Coble, John Hamilton. Arts, 

Coker, Robert Ervin, Science. 

Eller. John Carlton, . Philosophy, 

Evans, Leslie Ballard. Arts. 

Gregory, Edwin Clarke, Arts, 

Gwyn, James Alfred. Philosophy. 

Hollowell, James Gatling, Letters, 

Jenkins, Robert Palemon, Philosophy, 

Kirby, George Hughes, Science. 

Lemly, William Belo. Science, 

Little. Judge Elder, Arts, 

Nicholson. David Flowers, Arts, 

Nooe, John Francis, Philosophy, 

Robbins, Alfred Hargrave, Philosophy, 

Roberson, Wescott, Arts, 

Rollins, Edward Foy, Letters, 

Sanford, Thomas Franklin. Science, 

Shaffner. John Francis, Jr.. Science, 

Shannonhouse. Royal Graham, Arts, > 

Sharpe, Thomas Allen. Philosophy, 

Smith, William Cunningham, Philosophy, 

Stanly, Benjamin Edward, Science, 

Stephens, George Gullett, Philosophy, 

Webb, William Robert, Jr., Arts, 

White, Joseph Harvey, Science, 

White, James Samuel. Arts, 
Woodley, William Thomas, Jr., 

a.b. {Guilford College) 1894, Arts, 

Woodson, Walter Henderson, Science, 



Nashville, N. C. 

Battleboro. 

Charlotte. 

Eden. 

Bryson City. 

Summerfield. 

Durham. 

Winston. 

Laurinburg. 

Darlington, S. C. 

Berlin. 

Idaho. 

Halifax. 

Springdale. 

Elizabeth City. 

Elizabeth City. 

Raleigh. 

Salem. 

Longs. Store. 

Westbrook. 

Shelby. 

Lexington. 

Chapel Hill. 

Enno. 

Mocksville. 

Salem. 

Charlotte. 

Pineville. 

Greensboro. 

Kinston. 

Greensboro. 

Bellbuckle, Tenn. 

Graham. 

Mebane. 

Charlotte. 
Salisbury. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



61 



Junior Class. 



Allen, Arch Turner, Philosophy, 

Andrews, John Hawkins, Arts, 

Bailey, Fletcher Hamilton. Science, 

Boddie, William Willis, Philosophy, 

Canaday. Percy, Science, 

Candler, Thomas Thaddeus, Philosophy, 
Carmichael, William Donald, Jr., Philosophy, 

Connor, Henry Groves, Jr., Philosophy. 

Craige, Burton, Arts. 

Creekmore, Thomas Judson, Arts, 

Crinkley, William Andrew, Arts, 

Eatman, Darius, Arts, 

Edgerton, Allen Howard, Philosophy, 
Ferguson, William Burder, Jr., Arts, 

Fletcher. Roberson Smith, Philosophy, 

Graves, Ralph Henry, Arts, 

Graves, Victor Morse, Letters, 

Harris, Stanford Hunter, Science, 

Haywood, Fabius Julius, Jr., Arts, 

Horney, William Johnston. Arts, 

Howard, Ira Nathaniel, Science, 

Howard, William Stamps, Science, 

Hubbard, Richard Herring, Letters, 

Johnson, Fred Alexander, Letters, 
Kluttz, Theodore Franklin, Jr., Letters, 

Lane, William Cobb. Arts, 

Lentz, Jay Dick, Arts, 

Liles, Samuel Tilden. Arts, 

Long, John Archie, Philosop/hy, 
Mangum, Adolphus Williamson, Letters, 

McAlister. Thomas Gilmer. Philosophy. 

Mclver, Donald. Philosophy, 

McMullan, Percy Wood, Philosophy, 

McNairy, William Herbert, Philosophy, 

McRae, Lawrence, Arts, 



York Institute. 

Raleigh. 

Winston. 

Laurel. 

Southport. 

Acton. 

Dillon, S. C. 

Wilson. 

Washington, D. C. 

Indian Creek, Va. 

Warrenton. 

Oxford. 

Goldsboro. 

Waynesville. 

Adamsville, S. C. 

Chapel Hill. 

Selma. 

Raleigh. 

Raleigh. 

Greensboro. 

Berea. 

Tarboro. 

Clinton. 

Asheville. 

Salisbury, 

Goldsboro. 

Mooresville. 

Archer Lodge. 

Hyeotee. 

Chapel Hill. 

Ashboro. 

Sanford. 

Hertford. 

Greensboro. 

Chapel Hill. 



62 THE 


■COLLEGE 




Myers, •William Starr, 


Arts, 


Asheville. 


Newby, Oscar, 


Philosophy, 


Hertford. 


Nichols, William Johnson, 


Science, 


Greenville. 


Shepherd, Sylvester Browne, 


Arts. 


Washington. 


Smith. David Baird, 


Philosophy. 


Greensboro. 


Thompson, Percy Moran, 


Philosophy, 


Goldsboro. 


Underbill, Wingate, 


Arts, 


Selma. 


Weil, Lionel, 


Philosophy, 


Goldsboro. 


Weston, Bryan Whitfield. 


Science. 


Chapel Hill. 


Whitener, Robert Vance. 


Arts, 


Hickory. 


Williams, Albert Franklin, 


Arts. 


Kenansville. 


Williams, Joseph Solon, 


Arts. 


Clover. 


Winston. Hollis Taylor. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Wray, Joe Suctle. 


Arts. 


Shelby. 


Wright. Robert Herring'. 


Philosophy, 


Coharie. 


Wright. Thomas Loftin. 


Philosophy, 


Coharie. 






Sophomore Class. 



Andrews, Ira Edgerton Dwight, 
Askew, Edward Stevenson. 
Bell, Lorenzo James, 
Best, Benjamin Claudius, 
Best, Charles Exum, 
Brogden, Willis James, 
Busbee, Richard Smith. 
Carr, Charles Stuart, 
Carver, Oscar, 
Cheek, Paul Tinsley, 
Collier. Harris Taylor, 
Covington, Lawrence Everett. 
Dey, Calvert Rogers, 
Dozier, Jessie Knight. 
Eley, Peter Harden, 
Farrior, William Elbert, 
Follin, Robert Edward, 
Foscue, Fred Wooten, 
Graham, Edward Kidder. 



Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts. 


Windsor. 


Philosophy. 


Rutherford ton. 


Letters, 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy. 


Goldsboro. 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Arts, 


Goldsboro. 


Science, • * 


Roxboro. 


Philosophy, 


Mebane. 


Letters, 


Memphis, Tenn. 


Arts, 


Laurin^burg. 


Philosophy, 


Norfolk, Va. 


Arts, 


Tarboro. 


Arts, 


Williston, Tenn 


Science, 


Charlotte. 


Science, 


Winston. 


Science, 


Trenton. 


Philosophy, 


Charlotte. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



63 



Graham, Joseph, 
Gudger, Francis Asbury, 
Harding, Henry Patrick, ' 
Haywood, William Grimes, 
Henderson, Archibald, 
Herring, Benjamin Sims, 
Hines, Samuel Holder, 
Johnston, Charles Hughes, 
Lake, Henry Steers, 
Lewis, Richard Henry, Jr., 
McCormick, John Gilchrist, 
McNairy, Eugene Webster, 
Miller, Prank Wharton, 
Moize, Eddie Nevin, 
Moss, Eugene, 
Murphy, John Gerald. 
Murphy, John Ritch, 
Norwood, John Wall, 
Parker, James Daniel, 
Peace, Willis Grandy, 
Peirce, Henry Faison, 
Pinnix, Frank Mullen, 
Ruffin, George Mendenhall, 
Sams, Edward Emmett, 
Stevenson, James Martin, 
Suttle, Oscar Milton, 
Tate, George Knox, 
Tucker, John Hill, Jr., 
Usry, William Thomas, 
Walker, Herbert Dillon, 
Walker, John McCullough, 
Webb, James, Jr., 
Webb, Thomas Norfleet, 
Welch, William Dorsey, 
Whitaker, Percy DuPonceau. 
Whitlock, Paul Cameron, 
Winston, Abram Reneher, 



Philosophy, 


Hillsboro. 


Arts, 


Asheville. 


Arts, 


Greenville. 


Philosophy, 


Raleigh. 


Arts. 


Salisbury. 


Science. 


Wilson. 


Arts, 


Milton. 


Arts. 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


New York, N 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Arts, 


Maxton. 


Philosophy, 


Greensboro. 


Science, 


Winston. 


Science, 


Stem. 


Philosophy, 


Wilton. 


Science. 


Atkinson. 


Arts, 


Laurinburg. 


Arts, 


Waynesville. 


Philosophy. 


Benson. 


Arts, 


Oxford. 


Science, 


Warsaw. 


Philosophy, 


Lexington. 


Philosophy. 


Wilson. 


Philosophy, 


Mars Hill. 


Science, 


Wilmington. 


Philosophy, 


Shelby. 


Arts, 


Greensboro. 


Arts, 


Henderson. 


Arts, 


Wilton. 


Science, 


Creswell. 


Arts, ■ 


Charlotte. 


Arts, 


Hillsboro. 


Philosophy. 


Hillsboro. 


Science, 


Gliden. 


Philosophy. 


Raleigh. 


Science, 


Rockingham. 


Arts, 


Franklinton. 



64 



THE COM.EGE 



Wood, Edward Jenner, 



Arts, 



Wilmington. 



Fkeshman Class. 



Abbott,- John Claudius, 
Alston, Charles Skinner, 
Bagwell, Raleigh Mays, 
Baird, James Andrew, 
Baruhardt, Paul Abererombia, 
Earnhardt, Pines Craighead, 
Bellamy, Marsden, Jr., 
Borden, William Henry, Jr., 
Bost, William Thomas, 
Bowie, Thomas Contee, 
Boyd, John Raine, 
Boyd, Robert, 
Broadhurst, Edgar David, 
Bur well, Armistead, Jr., 
Buxton, Cameron BelQ, 
Caldwell, Julius Alexander, 
Carr, John Robert, 
Carr, Julian Shakespeare, Jr., 
Coker, Francis William, 
Connor, Robert Diggs Wimberley 
Costner, Hiram Archie, 
Cox, William Edward, 
Coxe, Fred Jackson, 
Crawford, John Gurney, 
Crawford, Walter Scott, 
Crisp, Roby Silvester, 
Davenport, James Fleming, 
Davis, Lewis Harvey, 
Davis, Robert Green, 
Denson, Claude Baker. Jr., 
Donnelly, John, 
Elliott, Milton Courtright, 
Ford, Singleton Cleightou, 



Arts, 


South Mills. 


A rts, 


Littleton. 


Philosophy, 


Fancy Hill. 


Science, 


Asheville. 


Science, 


Norwood. 


Science, 


Norwood. 


Arts. 


Wilmington. 


Science, 


Goldsboro. 


Arts, 


South River. 


Philosophy, 


Obids. 


Science, 


Reidsville. 


Philosophy, 


Wayuesville. 


Philosophy, 


Goldsboro. 


Science, 


Charlotte. 


Arts, 


Winston. 


Philosophy, 


Salisbury. 


Arts, 


Durham. 


Arts, 


Durham. 


Arts, 


Darlington, I 


Philosophy, 


Wilson. 


Science, 


Dallas. 


Arts, 


Coxville. 


Arts, 


Lilesville. 


Arts, 


Graham. 


Arts, 


Teer. 


Arts, 


Glenburnie. 


Philosophy, 


Pactolus. 


Philosophy, 


High Point. 


Arts, 


Henderson. 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Science, 


Wilmington. 


Arts, 


Louisburg. 



S. C. 



FRESHMAN CXASS 



65 



Gatling, Mark Pomeroy, 
Gatling, Langly Tayloe, 
Giles, Lionel, 
Giles, Percy, 
Gillam, Moses Braxton, 
Gorrell, Peter Albert, 
Grantham, Claud Marshall, 
Gray, Polk Cleburne, 
Grimes, Junius Daniel, 
Harris, Charles Foust, 
Hartley, Eugene Puller, 
Hewitt, Joseph Henry, 
Hill, Charles Gideon, 
Hill, Thomas Jefferson, 
Hopper, Allen Taylor, 
Howell, Robert Lee, 
Hume, Thomas, Jr., 
Jarvis, Joseph Brooks, 
Jones, Thomas Haskel, 
Kenan, Thomas Stephen, Jr., 
Kerr, James I_,oftin, 
Kittrell, Robert Gilliam, 
Kluttz, Warren Lawson, Jr., 
Knight, Kenneth Thigpen, 
Land, Edward Mayo, 
Lane, Benjamin Benson, Jr., 
Latta, James Edward, 
Lee, Enoch Lawrence, 
Lewis, Frank Cox, 
Lockett, Everett Augustine, 
London, Henry Manger, 
Long, George Pierce, 
McEachern, Edward Clemmons, 
McEachern, John Scarborough, 

Jr., 
McNair, James Lytch, 
Mason, William Wallace, 



Arts, 


Reynoldson. 


Philosophy, 


Sarem. 


Philosophy, 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy, 


Windsor. 


Philosophy, 


Winston. 


Science, 


Goldsboro. 


Philosophy, 


Mooresville. 


Arts, 


Grimesland. 


Philosophy, 


Falkland. 


Philosophy, 


Tyro Shops. 


Arts, 


Mapleton. 


Philosophy, 


Winston. 


Philosophy, 


Wehutty. 


Philosophy, 


Leaksville. 


Philosophy, 


Shelby. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy, 


Greenville. 


Philosophy, 


Jefferson. 


Science, 


Kenansville. 


Arts, 


Clinton. 


Philosophy, 


Kittrell. 


Arts, 


Salisbury. 


Arts, 


Lawrence. 


Arts, 


Littleton. 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Philosophy, 


Durham. 


Philosophy, 


Dunn. 


Arts, 


Kinston. 


Science, 


Winston. 


Arts, 


Pittsboro. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy, 


Wilmington. 


Philosophy, 


Wilmington. 


Philosophy, 


Laurel Hill. 


Pldlosophy, 


Chapel Hill. 



bb THE 


COLLEGE 




Meredith, Henry, 


Philosophy. 


Wilson. 


Miller. Alexander Clinton. 


Philosophy, 


Winston. 


Morgan, Horace Greeley. 


Science. 


Spring Hope. 


Nunn, Romulus Armistead. 


Science, 


Newbern. 


Osborne. Adlai. 


Science. 


Charlotte. 


Osborne, Francis Moore, 


Arts. 


Charlotte. 


Patterson, Edmund Vogler, 


Science. 


Salem. 


Payne, Prank Gravely, 


Philosophy. 


Greystone, Va. 


Philips. Joseph Battle. Jr., 


Philosophy, 


Battleboro. 


Pond, George Bahnsou, 


Science, 


Plattsburg, N. Y. 


Ray, Edgar Caldwell. Jr.. 


Science, 


McAdensville. 


Reeves. John Letcher. 


Philosophy, 


Independence. Va, 


Richardson. Donald Amos. 


Philosophy. 


Clinton. 


Rodman, Wiley Groom, 


Philosophy. 


Washington. 


Ross, John Kirkland, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Satterfield, Meldrum Winstead. 


, Science, 


Roxboro. 


Shelton, Henry Belo, 


Philosophy. 


Winston. 


Shull, Samuel Eakin. 


Science. 


Stroudsburg, Pa. 


Sitterson, Joseph Murden, Jr.. 


Arts, 


Williams ton. 


Smith. William Alma. 


Philosophy, 


Norwood. 


Spence, Joseph Albert, 


Arts, 


Palmerville. 


Swink, Gilbert Roscoe, 


Philosopihy, 


Winston. 


Thompson, Alfred Marshe. 


Science, 


Raleigh. 


Thorne, John Thomas. 


Philosophy. 


Fieldboro. 


Vaughn, Frank Lewis. 


Science, 


Winston. 


Vick, George Davis, 


Arts. 


Selma. 


Wade, Benjamin Thomas. 


Philosophy, 


Troy. 


Wagstaff, Henry McGilbert. 


Philosopihy, 


Olive Hill 


Wagstaff, Thomas Clifton, 


Philosophy, 


Olive Hill. 


Webb, William James, 


Arts, 


Stem. 


White, James Albert, 


Arts, 


Scotland Neck. 


Willis, James Cousar, 


Arts, 


McColl, S. C. 


Winston, Robert Alonza, 


Arts, 


• Franklinton. 


Woodson, Ernest Horatio, 


Arts, 


Salisbury. 



OPTIONAL STUDENTS 



67 



Optional Students. 



NAME. YEAR. 

Abernethy, Eric Alonzo, First Tear, 

Austin, Willis Hinton, Third Tear, 

Bailey, Maurice DeJernett, Second Tear, 

Belden, Arthur Williams, Third Tear, 

Berrier, Zero Otho, Second Tear, 

Bowling, Edgar Simeon, First Tear, 

Brown, Lewis Blanchard. First Tear, 

Bunn, James Philips, First Tear, 

Burgwyn, George Pollok, Jr., First Tear, 

Canaday, James Parrott, Second Tear, 

Carson, James McEntire, Second Tear, 

Clifton, Maurice Smith, Second Tear, 

Cobb, Arthur, First Tear, 

Cocke, Philip Charles, First Tear, 

Copple, Thomas Moses, First Tear, 

Cox, Walter Oscar, First Tear, 

Cutlar, Louis Julien Poisson, Third Tear, 

Crank, Thomas Woodruff, First Tear, 

Daggett, Walter Hyer, First Tear, 

Davidson, Wilber Edwin, First Tear, 

Erwin, Leander Marable, First Tear, 
Ewart, Hamilton Gustavius, Jr., First Tear, 
Featherston, Ambrose Augustus. 

Jr., First Tear, 

Flowers, Albert Ruffin, Third Tear, 

Glenn, William Bynum, First Tear, 

Gold, Pleasant Daniel, Jr., Second Tear, 

Green, Walter Scott, Second Tear, 

Hardin, Walter Reade, First Tear, 

Harrell, Albert Bernard, Second Tear, 

Harrell, George Abner, Second Tear, 

Harris, Cornelius Whitfield, First Tear, 

Hawes, John Robert, Jr., First Tear, 

Hill, Stuart Hall, Third Tear, 



RESIDENCE. 

Beaufort. 

Clayton. 

Winston. 

Wilmington. 

Salem. 

Rougemont. 

New York, N.-Y. 

Rocky Mount. 

Jackson. 

Benson. 

Rutherford ton. 

Louisburg. 

Durham. 

Asheville. 

Hannersville. 

Winston. 

Wilmington. 

Houston, Texas. 

Wilmington. 

Asheville. 

Asheville. 

Hendersonville. 

Asheville. 

Wilson. 

Winston. 

Wilson. 

Pearidge. 

Sparta. 

Dunn. 

Henderson. 

Seaboard. 

Atkinson. 

Halifax. 



THE COLLEGE 



Hobbs, Lalister Matthew. First Year, 

Holt, Stephen Sneed, Second Year. 

Houpe, John Rufus, First Year, 

Johnson, Ferdie Badger, Third Year, 

Johnston, John Wright, Second Year, 

Jones, Charles Earl Johnson, Second Year, 

Kearney, Robert Edward, Second Year, 

Kenney, Stephen White, Second Year, 

McAdoo, William, First Year, 

Mcintosh, Arthur Leroy, First Year, 

McPhail. Lorenzo Dow, First Year, 

McReynolds, Scott, First Year, 

Meads, Stanton Alphonzo. First Year, 

Mizell, William Gaston, First Year, 

Moize, Alvis Marion, First Year, 

Newby, George Edgar, Second Year, 

Nickjin, Samuel Strang, First Year, 

Patterson, Fred Geer, First Year, 

Pearsall, Fred Leon, First Year, 

Rogers, Frank Owington, Second Year, 

Rucker, William Flanning, Second Year, 

Seagle, John Creighton, Second Year, 

Shaw, Philip Ervin, First Year, 

Sisk, Ray Dean. First Year, 

Small, Charles Onslow, First Year, 
Sowerby, Jonathan Dickinson, Second Year, 

Stallings. Daniel Monroe, First Year, 

Summersill, Edward White, First Year, 

Sykes, Robert Hiden, First Year, 

Thomas, John Stanley, Second Year, 

Ward, Homer Benjamin, First Year, 

Whitaker. Joel, First Year, 

Williams, Roy, First Year, 
Williams, William Heinrich, li.E. 

(Virginia Military Institute), First Year. 

Winstead, Claude Green, Second Year, 



Clinton. 
Smithfield. 
Statesville. 
Clinton. 
Smithfield. 
Asheville. 
Franklin ton. 
Windsor. 
Greensboro. 
Sanford. 
Clinton. 
Asheville. 
Weeksville. 
Windsor. 
Stem. 

Hertford. [Tenn. 
Chattanooga, 
Chapel Hill. 
Wilmington. 
Concord. 
Rutherfordton. 
Hendersonville. 
Hartshorn. 
Franklin. 
Adelaide. 
Waynesville. 
Concord. 
Jacksonville. 
Wilmington. 
Newbern. 
Echo. 
Raleigh. 
■Asheville. 

Asheville. 
Roxboro, 



OrTIONAL STUDENTS 



69 



Wilson, William Sydney, 
Yar borough. Charles Garrett, 
B. E. ( N. C. Agricultural and 
Mechanical College) 1895, 



First Year 



Gate wood. 



First Year. Locust Hill. 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



FACULTY. 

JOHN MANNING. LL.D.. Professor of Common and Statute Law 
and Equity. 

KEMP PLTJMMER BATTLE, LL.D., Professor of Constitutional 
History and International Laic. 

GEORGE TAYLOE "WINSTON, LL.D.. Professor of Political and 

Social Science. 

JAMES EDWARD SHEPHERD, LL.D., Associate Professor of 
Common and Statute Law and Equity in the Summer Law School. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The Law School provides two courses of study, each extending 
over a period of one College year. Instruction is given by means 
of text-books, lectures, the study of leading cases, and moot courts. 
Special lectures are given by the resident instructors and by mem- 
bers of the -bar on such subjects as have been greatly modified by 
our Statutes or by the development of our civilization. The 
courses are as follows: — 

First Year. 

Professor Manning. 
1 . Blaekstone's Commentaries. Washburn or Williams on Real 
Property. Scbouler on Executors. Stephen on Pleading. 
Browne on the Domestic Relations. Adams's Equity. First 
Greenleaf on Evidence. Smith on Contracts. Bigelow or 
Pollock on Torts. Angell and Ames on Corporations. 
Black's Constitutional Law. The Code of North Carolina, 
particularly the Code of Ciyil Procedure. Eight hours a 
yxek. 



MOOT COURT 71 

This course is prescribed by the Supreme Court of North 
Carolina for applicants for license to practice law. 

Second Year. 

2. Pollock or Clark on Contracts. Bigelow or Norton on Bills. 

Cheques and Notes. Morawetz on Private Corporations. 
Dillon on Municipal Corporations. Best's Principles of 
Evidence, or Starkie on Evidence. Darlington or Smith 
on Personal Property. Browne or Benjamin on Sales. 
May on Insurance. Huffcut on Agency. Russell on Crimes, 
or Wharton's or Clark's Criminal Law. Six hours a week. 
Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

Other Studies. 

Professor Battle. 

3. Constitutional History and International Law. Two hours a 

week. 
Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

Professor Winston. 

4. Political Economy and Social Science. Two hours a week. 

Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 



MOOT COURT. 

The moot court is an important factor in legal educational meth- 
ods; it familiarizes the student with the practical side of law. It 
is the purpose of the University court to acquaint the student with 
the legal details so necessary to be acquired yet so difficult of 
access. Regular sessions are held, and every student in the Law 
School has frequent opportunity for practice. The work is 
thorough and carried on from the inception of the suit to the final 
judgment in the Appellate Court. The Court is held every Sat- 
urday night. Three hours a week, 



72 



Judge, 



THE LAW SCHOOL 

Court of Appeals. 

Professor Manning. 



Superior Court. 



Judge, 

Associate Justice, 
Clerk,' 
Sheriff, 



L. T. Hartsell. 
R. W. Dalby. 
"W. D. Grimes. 

S. Hare. 



THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred by the 
University upon candidates who have completed courses ] , 2, 3 and 
4, and have passed all examinations with credit. Two years of 
residence are ordinarily required of all students who desire to offer 
themselves as candidates for the degree. Every candidate must 
submit a thesis on some subject selected by the Senior Professor 
of Law. 



EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition in the Law School is one hundred dollars a 
year, one half payable at the beginning of each term, in Septem- 
ber and in January. Students who intend to apply for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, or to remain in the class two years, can do so 
by paying, in advance, one hundred and fifty dollars. A student 
in the Law School has no other fee to pay unless he occupy a Uni- 
versity room. For assignment of rooms, see page 53. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Law School should present 



STUDENTS 



73 



themselves on the same days and at the same hours with candidates 
for admission into the College. Candidates for admission and stu- 
dents already members of the School are expected to register ac- 
cording to the regulations on page 58. The session of the Law 
School is of the same length with the College year. 

All members of the Law School enjoy the same privileges with 
other students in the University. 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 

During the summer two classes in Law are conducted by Pro- 
fessors Manning and Shepherd. The text-books used are the same 
with those required in course 1. 

The summer session begins on the first day of July and ends on 
the Thursday before the last Monday in September. 

The fee for admission into either class is thirty dollars; for ad- 
mission into both classes, sixty dollars. All fees are payable in 
advance. 



STUDENTS. 



Second Year. 



Hartsel, Luther Thompson, ph.b. 
[Trinity College) 1804, 



RESIDENCE. 



Concord. 



First Year. 



Barnes, David Collins, 
Bassett, Lucien Virginius, 
Bellamy, William James, 
Brinson, Samuel Mitchell, a.b. 

(Wake Forest College) 1891, 
Carr, James Osborne, ph.b. 1895, 
Dalby, Robert Warland, 
Dockery, Alfred Settle, y 



Murfreesboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
Wilmington. 

Newbern. 
Xenia. 
Oxford. 
Rockingham, 



74 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



Godwin, Hannibal Lafayette, 

Grimes, William Demsie, 

Hare, Starkey, 

Harrell, George Abner, 

Hughes, Heenan, 

Hurley, Riley Thomas, 

MoAlister, William Claudius, a.b. 1895, 

Merritt, William Daniel,^ 

Mitchell, Wayne Adolphus, 

Mouser, Raymond Joel, 

Overman, Harry James, 

Park, Gwyn Lee, 

Presnel, Francis Edward, 

Raby, Andrew Dempsey, 

Ray, McDuffie, 

Rose, Lewis Lake, 

Smith, Edwin Sanders, 

Stamey, John Wesley, 

Warren, Thomas Davis, 



Dunn. 

Grimesland. 

Tunis. 

Henderson. 

Elon College. 

Troy. 

Tatum, S. C. 

Roxboro. 

Kinston. 

Hickory. 

Salisbury. 

Elkin. 

Waynesville. 

Whittier. 

Buck Forest. 

Atlantic City,N. J. 

Linden. 

Clyde. 

Edenton. 



Summer School. 

Abernethy, Charles Laban, ^ 

Anderson, George Gallatin, \/ 

Aston, McKay Bernard, 

Austin, Samuel Francis, a.b. 1893. *" 

Batchelor, Van Astor,^ 

Breese, William Edmund, Jr.. V 

Brinson, Samuel Mitchell, a.b. 

( Wake Forest College) 1891, 
Buie, William Douglas, a.b. 1892. U- 
Butler, Marion, a.b. 1885, 
Cade, Baylus, 
Cooke, John M., 
Dixon, James Washington, 
Dockery, Oliver Hart, Jr., a.b. 

( Wake Forest College) 1892, 



Beaufort. 

Milesville. 

Greeneville.Tenn. 

Clayton. 

Nashville. 

Asheville. 

Newbern. 
Clarkton. 
Washington, D.C. 
Franklinton. 
Elou College. 
Troy. 

Mangum, 



STUDENTS 



75 



Gaskill, James R., 

Gregson, "Walter James, 

Green, Thomas Lincoln, f 

Hare, Starkey, 

Hughes, Heenan, 

Justice, George Washington.^ 

Landis, Edward Graham, 

McCorkle, Charles Milton, /-"- 

McNeil, James William, •- 

Mewborn, Sidney Graham, 

Overman, Harry Lee, 

Pippin, Joseph Powell, ■«- 

Price, Augustus Hobson^ 

Rollins, Thomas Scott, utt.b. 1894,*- 

Shuford, Ernest William, 

Shannonhouse, Prank McRae, 

Walser, Zenobian Ihner, 

Wilcox, Elias Bunn, 



Tarboro. 

Ashboro. 

Clyde. 

Tunis. 

Elon College. 

Asheville. 

Oxford. 

Newton. 

Wilkesboro. 

Snow Hill. 

Salisbury. 

Tarboro. 

Salisbury. 

Asheville. 

Calhoun. 

Charlotte. 

Yadkin College. 

Rocky Mount. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



FOUNDATION. 

Medical Colleges of the best grade often fail to furnish thorough 
instruction in those subjects which constitute the foundation of 
medical science and which are therefore necessary to the intelli- 
gent practice of the medical profession. While these colleges 
possess every facility for instruction in the higher branches, their 
large number of students presents an obstacle to the correct teach- 
ing of the fundamental branches which is seldom overcome. For 
example, it is very difficult to properly teach anatomy to a class 
numbering five or six hundred members, since only those students 
who occupy the front benches of the amphitheater are near enough 
to see what the lecturer is demonstrating. If they would learn in 
the dissecting halls, they must do so practically unaided. We 
thus understand why it is that of the candidates who come before 
the North Carolina Board of Medical Examiners for license, only 
about one third, on an average, pass its comparatively easy exami- 
nation in anatomy. On the other hand, the practice of reading a 
year under a physician before attending a medical college is a cus- 
tom honored only by time. The absence of dissecting material and 
other facilities for practical work, the impossibilities of regular 
instruction by a busy practitioner, and the fact that the practition- 
er is often unavoidably "rusty" in just these elementary branches, all 
conspire to render the year of reading little better than useless. 
There is, therefore, need of a good preparatory school, and it was 
with the conviction that such a school could accomplish much good 
that the Medical School of the University of North Carolina was 
established. Let the student be first well grounded in the ele- 
ments of medicine, and then he will be in a position to enjoy with 
intelligent appreciation the clinical advantages which the diploma- 
granting colleges possess. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 



FACULTY. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, M.D., Professor of Anatomy, 

Physiology and Materia Medica. 
FRANCIS PRESTON VEN ABLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 
HENRY van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Professor Gore. 

1. Elementary Physics. The fundamental facts of the subject 

presented and the general laws illustrated by experiments. 
Two hours a week. 

Professor Venable. 

2. Experimental Chemistry. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hours a week. 

The facts and general principles of chemistry are presented 
in the following order: Chemical Physics, Chemistry of 
Non-metals and Metals, Organic Chemistry. 

Students who have previously studied Chemistry may elect, 
instead of this course, Chemistry 4 and 5 in the College. 

Professor Wilson. 

3. Histology. Lectures, with laboratory work. Sch lifer's His- 

tology. Three hours a week [spring term). 

Professor Whitehead. 

4. Anatomy. Dissection, with study of skeleton ,and cadaver. 

Gray's Anatomy. Ten hours a week [fall term). 

Conceptions of anatomy gained from books and plates are 
misleading and evanescent. The only way by which true 
and useful knowledge of the subject may be imparted is 
the so-called object-lesson method of teaching. The stu- 
dent must see and verify for himself the truths of anatomy 
as they exist in nature, and not in pictures; he must dis- 
sect, and study the dissected cadaver, and that, too, under 
a competent instructor, who is willing to give his time to 
the work. In addition to dissecting, the student is required 
te pass certain practical examinations upon the skeleton 
and cadaver, the better to impress the truths previously 



78 THE 5IEDICAL SCHOOL 

learned and to obtain familiarity with the relations of the 
various structures. 

5. Physiology, with special study of the nerves and digestive sys- 

tems. Yeo's Physiology. Seven hours a week (spring term). 

6. Materia Medica. The study of the geographical and botan- 

ical sources of the principal drugs, with their chief prepa- 
rations and doses and especially their physiological action. 
White's Materia Medica. Three hours a week [spring term). 

PECUNIARY AID. 

The Harris Prize. (Established in 1895.) Mrs. T. W. Harris 
offers, in honor of the late Dr. T. W. Harris, a pocket case of in- 
struments to that student who shall make the best grade in anato- 
my. 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1892.) Mrs. Mary 
Sprunt Wood, of Wilmington, has founded in memory of her late 
husband. Dr. Thomas Fanning Wood, a scholarship of the value 
of ninety dollars. 

EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition in the Medical School is one hundred dollars 
a year, one half payable at the beginning of each term, in Septem- 
ber and in January. A student in the Medical School has no other 
fee to pay unless he occupy a University room. For assignment of 
rooms, see page 53. Board costs from six to thirteen dollars a 
month. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Medical School should present 
themselves on the same days and at the same hours with candi- 
dates for admission into the Colleg e. Candidates for admission 
and students already members of the School are expected to regis- 



STUDENTS 



79 



ter according- to the regulations on page 58. The session of the 
Medical School is of the same length with the College year. 

All members of the Medical School enjoy the same privileges 
with other students in the University. 



STUDENTS. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

£psBahnson, Frederic Fries, Salem. 

Brown, Thomas Evans Westman, b.s. 1895, Asheville. 

V Bryson, Daniel Rice, Bryson City. 

Cason, Harry Marchant Shaw, Edenton. 

Davis, Thomas Whitmell, Louisburg. 

Dowd, Milton, Charlotte. 

Edwards, Arthur Joseph, Winston. 

Edwards, Samuel, Goldsboro. 

* Evans, Leslie Ballard, Idaho. 

Graham, William Alexander, a.b. 1895, Hillsboro. 

Green, Thomas Meares, Wilmington. 

Heilig, Herman Gilbert, Salisbury. 

Humphrey, Lotte William, Goldsboro. 

Joyner, Claudius Cameron, Greenville. 

Koonce, Francis Duval, Jr., Richlands. 

Nixon, Edwin Jones, Creswell. 

Nobles, Joseph Everett, Greenville. 

^ SNooe, John Francis, Shelby. 

Pollock, Raymond, Kinston. 

Profit, Thomas Jackson, Mast. 

Shaffner, John Francis, Jr., Salem. 

Steele, Robert Thomas Stephen, b.s. 1895, Rockingham. 

Thomas, Pride Jones, Wilmington. 

Van Poole, Gideon McDonald, Craven. 

Walker, Lee Albert, Anderson. 

Weaver, William Jackson, litt.b. 1895. Asheville. 

Whitehead, Joseph Phillips, Rocky Mount. 

Wimberly, Joseph Powell, Battleboro. 

Young, James Wesley, Lexington. 

Zachary, Robert Edgar, ph.b. 1895, Jeptha. 



^ 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL (1895). 



FACULTY. 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN. Ph.B.. Superintendent, and 
Professor of Pedagogics. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE. LL.D.. Professor of History. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE. C.E.. Professor of Physics. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B.. Professor of Geology. 

THOMAS HUME, D.D., LL.D.. Professor of the English Language 
and Literature. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY. M.A.. Professor of Modern Languages. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C.E.. Professor of Mathematics. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

JAMES THOMAS PUGH. A.M., Instructor in Latin. 

HERMAN HARRELL HORN E. A.M.. Instructor in Modem Lan- 
guages. 

PHILANDER PRIESTLY CLAXTOX. A.M.. Instructor in Edu- 
cational Psychology and Methods. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, Instructor in Methods 
in Arithmetic and Algebra. 

ALEXANDER GRAHAM. A.M.. Instructor in English Grammar 
and Psychology. 

LOGAN DOUGLASS HOWELL. A.B.. Instructor in Elementary 
Latin. 

ELISHA BETTS LEWIS. Instructor in Geography. 

THOMAS JAMES WILSON, Jr., A.B.. Instructor in Greek. 

MATILDA COFFIN. Instructor in Primary Work. 

MINNIE REDFORD. Instructor in Primary Beading and Language- 
icork. 

CLARENCE R. BROWN, Instructor in Vocal Culture. 



COTTRSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Greek. 

Mr. Wilson. 

1. Elementary Course. White's Beginner's Greek Book. Five 

hours a week. 

The aim of this course is to prepare for the reading - of 
Xenophon's Anabasis. 

2. Advanced Course. Xenophon's Anabasis. Five hours a week. 

Latin. 

Mr. Howell. 

1. Elementary Course. The inductive study of some Latin text. 

Firr hours a week. 

2. Caesar's Gallic War. by the inductive method. Fire hours a 

week. 

Mr. PUGH. 

3. Livy (Books XXI. and XXII.). Composition. Reading at 

sight. Five hours a week. 

4. Horace (Odes). Three hours a week. 

German. 

Mr. HORNE. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. German prose. Harris's 

German Lessons. Storm (Immensee). Fire hours a week. 

Professor Toy. 

2. Advanced Course. Freytag (Die Journalistenl. Sheldon's 

German Grammar. Harris's Composition. Five hours a 
week. 

French. 

Mr. HORNE. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. French prose. Chardenal's 
First French Course. Super's Reader. Five hours a week. 



82 THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Professor Toy. 
2. Advanced Course. HaleVy(L'Abb£ Constantin). Grandgent's 
Grammar, and Materials for Composition. Five hours a 
week. 

English. 

Professor Hume. 

1. Anglo-Saxon, and the Historical Development of the English 

Language. Cook's First Book in English and Emerson's 
History of English. Twenty Lectures. 

2. English Literature. Discussion of the English History Plays 

of Shakspere, with illustrative readings. Twenty Lectures. 

History. 

Professor Battle. 

1. The Constitutional History of the United States and of North 
Carolina. Twenty Lectures. 

Mathematics. 

Mr. Noble. 

1. Arithmetic and Algebra, with special reference to methods of 

teaching. Eight hours a week. 

Professor CAIN. 

2. Plane Geometry (Wentworth). Five hours a week. 

3. Plane Trigonometry (Wentworth). Five hours a week. 

Physics. 

Professor Gore. 

1. Physics as adapted to the needs of teachers in high schools 
and academies, with experiments in the laboratory. Twen- 
ty lectures. 

Chemistry. 

Assistant Professor Baskerville. 
1. Elementary Course in General Chemistry. Lectures, with 
experiments. Five hours a week. 



COUHBES OF IN8TEUCTION 83 

2. Experiments. A course in the laboratory running parallel 
with course 1. Five hours a week. 

* Geology. 

Professor HOLMES. 

1. Geology and Physical Geography. Seven lectures. 

The aim of this course is to encourage and illustrate the 
study of local geology and geograijhy by teachers and their 
pupils. The illustrations used will apply so far as possible 
to localities in North Carolina. During the afternoons ex- 
cursions will be made into the country about Chapel Hill 
for practical examinations of the geology and geography 
of the region. 

Pedagogics. 

Professor Alderman. 

1. De Garmo's Essentials of Method. Twenty lectures. 

The aim of this course is to summarize briefly the influence 
of Rousseau. Pestalozzi and Spencer upon educational 
thought, and to explain at some length what is most sug- 
gestive in the Herbartian movement in Germany and in 
America. 

Mr. Claxton. 

2. Educational Psychology. Twenty-five lectures. 

3. Elementary Science. Fifteen lectures. 

Mr. Graham. 

4. Physiology and Grammar. Five hours a meek. 

Miss Coffin. 

5. Elementary Instruction in Public Schools. Twenty lectures. 

Mr. Lewis. 
6 Structural and Climatic Geography, as presented by Humboldt, 
Ritter, and Guyot. 

Miss Redford. 

7. The Model Class. Five hours a week. 

The aim of this course is threefold: to furnish a school of 
observation, to drill teachers, and to give teachers an op- 
portunity to put into practice the lessons previously given 
to themselves and to the pupils in the school of observa- 
tion, 



84 THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Music. 

Mr. Brown. 

1. Sight-reading, scale-practice, rudiments of music far sight- 

singing and teaching, with choral practice. Six hours a 
week. 

2. Private lessons in vocal production, breathing, tone-placing, 

and artistic singing. One hour a week. 

EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCES. 

Each day there is a conference of the entire school for the dis- 
cussion of vital matters relating to the theory and practice of 
teaching and to school administration. The superintendents of 
the city schools and other prominent educators lead in these dis- 
cussions. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Every student in the Summer School who is not a member of 
another department of the University may receive a certificate of 
attendance and work satisfactorily completed. 

A student who is already a member of another department of 
the University, or a student who desires to enter another depart- 
ment, is credited for work done in the Summer School upon which 
he has passed a satisfactory examination. 

Opportunity is thus afforded to young men of limited means to 
diminish the time required for a degree, while teachers of special 
subjects in the public or private schools may, by attending several 
sessions of the Summer School, complete the University courses in 
any department of study offered. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition fee $5.00 

Registration fee 1.00 

A student in the Summer School has no other fee to pay unless 



ADMISSION AND HEGI8TBATI0N 85 

he take a course in Music. The fee for Music 1 is one dollar; for 
Music 2, five dollars. In Chemisti'y 2 a student pays two dollars 
for materials and breakage. 

Board at hotels costs from ten to fifteen dollars a month. Cheap- 
er rates may be had in private houses and in clubs. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

• 

The Summer School begins on the last Tuesday in June and ends 
on the last Friday in July. All persons desiring to be admitted 
are expected to present themselves at 10 a.m., in Gerrard Hall, 
on the first day of the session. 

All members of the Summer Sch ool enjoy the same privileges with 
other students in the University. 



86 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



STUDENTS. 



NAMK. 

Abernethy, Charles Laban, 
Adams, Sallie, 
Albertson, Kate, 
Albright. Walter Hatch, 
, Alderman. Kate, 
Allison, Fannie Lou, 
Amick, Thomas Cicero, 
Atkinson, Robena, 
Atwater, Hattie Lee, 
Austin, James Elbert, 
Barnes. Elijah Jesse, 
Bates, Grace Harding, 
Battle. Bessie, 
Bethune, Sallie, 
Bivins, John Addison, 
Blair, Ada, 
Blair, Elva Jane. 
Bonitz, Norma, 
Brogden, Hattie, 
Browning, Alan. 
Bryant, Dixie Lee, 
Caldwell, Nannie. 
Cameron, John Worthy. 
Canada, John William, 
Cobb, Mariana, 
Cook, Nellie, 
Craig, Mary. 

Creekmore, Thomas Judson. 
Crocker, Thomas Richard, 
Cronly, Mary, 
Cuthhbertson. Minnie, 
Daggett, Rebecca Hopkins, 
Daniels, Sue B., 



RESIDENCE. 

Beaufort. 

Gibson Station. 

Elizabeth City. 

Sandy Grove. 

Wilmington. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Ingram, Va. 

Selma. 

Oxford. 

Orangeburg, S. C. 

Smithfield. 

Raleigh. 

Durham. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

High Point. 

Oxford. 

Goldsboro. 

Oxford. 

University Station. 

Greensboro. 

Greensboro. 

Durham. 

Smithfield. 

Goldsboro. 

Wilmington. 

Ahoskie. 

Indian Creek, Va. 

Smithfield. 

Wilmington. 

Charlotte. 

Wilmington. 

Satterwhite, 



8TUDE»fT8 



87 



Davis, Robert Mayo, 
Donnelly, Margaret. 
Dozier, Martha. 
Drake, Winnie, 
Durant, Mrs. J. P., 
Durham, Lillie, 
Eggleston, J. D., 
Ellington. Jessie Dona, 
Ellis, Caswell, 
Eskridge, Jessie, 
Falls, Elizabeth, 
Parlo\v,;Margaret Edna. 
Fleming. Belle, 
Fonville. Frank Peirce, 
Foushee, Mrs. O. B.. 
Foust, Julius Isaac, 
Fuller, Ida, 
Gardner. Adelaide, 
Graham, Amma Daniel, 
Graham, Joseph, 
Graham, Mary O., 
Grandy, Lillie, 
Grantham, Elonzo Bowden. 
Green, Alice, 
Grimsley, George A., 
Grissom, Ada Virginia, 
Hall, Sue Eliza, 
Hankins, Annie. 
Harrell, George Abner, 
Harris. Kate, 
Hart, Mrs. Louisa, 
Hawkins, Lucy Williams. 
Heins, Sophia Elizabeth, 
Hendon, Loula, 
Hicks, Mrs. Hettie Minor, 
Hirshinger, Sadie James, 
Holden, Lizzie, 



Tarboro. 

Charlotte. 

Tarboro. 

Macon. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Asheville. 

Clayton. 

Louisburg. 

Shelby. 

Kings Mountain. 

Archdale. 

Raleigh. 

Burlington. 

Durham. 

Goldsboro. 

Laurens, S. C. 

Shelby. 

Ridgeway. 

Hillsboro. 

Charlotte. 

Elizabeth City. 

Newton Grove. 

Wilmington. 

Greensboro. 

Kittrell. 

Wilmington. 

Wilmington. 

Henderson. 

Charlotte. 

Wilson. 

Warrenton. 

Wilmington. 

Chapel Hill. 

Oxford. 

Charlotte. 

Hillsboro. 



88 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Holland, Alice. 
Holloway, Alvis Connor, 
Hume, Mrs. Thomas, 
Humphrey, Mrs. M. O., 
Humphrey, R. A., 
Hutchison, Charlee, 
/Johnson, Kate, 
Jones, Nina Daly, 
Jordan, Mrs. Annie Wynne, 
Kearney, Robert Edward, 
Kenney, Stephen White, 
Lawrence, L. Kate, 
Lawrence, Walter Phalti, 
Lewis, Anna, 
Lindsay, Lizzie, 
Little, Judge Elder, 
Long, Paul Jones, 
Mangurn, Ernest Preston, 
Martin, Mrs. Leonora, 
McAlister, John Worth, 
McArthur, Mary, 
McCall, Julia, 
McCaull, Angela, 
McCaull, Margaret, 
Mclver, Lizzie Patterson, 
McRae, Lawrence, 
Meacham, Mary, 
Mendenhall, Elihu Pinckney, 
Micheaux, Anna Mead, 
Miller, Emma, 
Mills, Mary Palmer, 
Moore, John Allen, 
Moses, Edward Payson, 
Nash, Mattie, 
Nicholson, David Flowers, 
Oliver, Anna L., 
Parmele, Ethel, 



Charlotte. 

Poes. 

Chapel Hill. 

Goldsboro. 

Goldsboro. 

Charlotte. 

Wilmington. 

Charlotte. 

Durham. 

Franklinton. 

Windsor. 

Raleigh. 

Elon College. 

Goldsboro. 

Greensboro. 

Longs Store. 

Jackson. 

Chapel Hill. 

Greensboro. 

Ashboro. 

Lumber Bridge 

Statesville. 

Greensboro. 

Greensboro. 

Greensboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Lambsville. 

Newbern. 

Greensboro. 

Pineville. 

Raleigh. 

Oaks. 

Rock Hill, S 

Goldsboro. 

Westbrook. 

Reidsville. 

Wilmington, 



C. 



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Q 

sr 



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M 

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STUDENTS 



89 



Parish, Laura Virginia, 
Patterson, Flora, 
Reid, James Walker, 
Rollins, Edward Foy, 
Rose, Annie Lee, 
Royster, Edith, 
Schubert, Rev. Louis Hector, 
Scott, Mrs. Mary Davidson, 
Shannonhouse, Royal Graham, 
Snipes, Eugene Malcolm, 
Speight, Robert Powell, 
Stansel, Mattie, 
Switzer, Laura. 
Thompson, Ida Sallie, 
Tomlinson, Berta, 
Toms, Clinton White, 
Tuck, Julia, 
Twitty, Mrs. S. D.. 
Warren, Thomas Davis, 
Webb, Addie, 
Webb, Lucy Taylor, 
Whitaker, Bessie Lewis, 
Whitaker, Percy, 
Williams. John Robert, 
Wills, Mary. 
Wilson, Edwin Mood, 
Wilson,. Mrs. Sallie May, 
Womble, Ada V., 
Wood, Fannie Loftin, 
Woodley, William Thomas. 
Woodward, Ellen, 
Wray, Lily, 
Young, Lelia, 



Concord. 

San ford. 

Pineville. 

Enno. 

Wilmington. 

Raleigh. 

Chapel Hill. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Wrendale. 

Allenton. 

Beaufort. 

Durham. 

Durham. 

Durham. 

Selma. 

Oxford. 

Edenton. 

Stem. 

Stem. 

Raleigh. 

Raleigh. 

Clayton. 

Brinkleyville. 

Haverford, Penn. 

Partlow, Va. 

Raleigh. 

Rockingham. 

Charlotte. 

Fayetteville. 

Shelby. 

Charlotte. 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 



OFFICERS. 

EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, Ph.B., Supervisor. 
BENJAMIN WYCHE, Litt.B., Librarian. 
WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM SMITH, Assistant in the Library. 
RICHARD GOLD ALLSBROOK, Assistant in the Library. 



The University Library numbers twenty-six thousand bound 
volumes and ten thousand pamplets. It is arranged in twenty-two 
sub-divisions, of which the following are the chief: — 

Reference, Mythology and Art, 

Political and Social Science, Modern Languages, 

Poetry and Drama, Jurisprudence, 

Religion and Theology, Biography and Memoirs, 

Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit, Education, 

Medicine and Hygiene, Fiction, 

History, Science, 

Philosophy, Mathematics, 

Literature and Language, Public Documents. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University, the 
Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies made a donation of 
their valuable collection of twenty thousand volumes to the Libra- 
ry, and provided for its perpetual endowment. The official title of 
the Library now is The Library of the University of North 
Carolina endowed by the Dialectic and Philanthropic 
Literary Societies. 

The funds available for the increase of the Library are expended 
semi-annually under the direction of the Supervisor, the Librarian, 
and the Library Committee, with special reference to the instruc- 
tion given in the University. The annual increase from purchase, 
bequests and exchanges averages about one thousand volumes, 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRAE!" 91 

The books are carefully arranged and catalogued by subject and 
author. 

Many changes in the arrangement and administration of the 
Library have been made in the direction of better light, more 
room, and greater efficiency and comfort. The Librarian and his 
Assistants are in attendance to give help in any line of research or 
reading. The Reading-room and library table are supplied with 
the best foreign and American periodicals and the leading news- 
papers of the State and Nation. The students of the University 
are allowed access, under necessary limitations, to the bookshelves. 
The Library and the Reading-room are open every week-day from 
8:30 a.m. to 1 P.M., and from 2 to 5 p.m. 



THE PHYSICAL LABOEATOEY. 



OFFICERS. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE. C.E., Director, and Professor of Phys- 
ics. 
JAMES ALFRED GWYN, Assistant in Physics. 



The Physical Laboratory - is in the South Building. Adjoining 
the lecture-room are two rooms, one of which is used for appara- 
tus and the other for a laboratory. A small room connecting with 
the laboratory is fitted up for a work-shop, being provided with 
lathe for wood and metal, and tools for preparing and making appa- 
ratus. The apparatus for class-room illustration is kept in large 
cases in the lecture-room. 

The members of the Junior Class are required to make a limited 
number of experiments to familiarize themselves somewhat with 
the methods of experimentation, to acquire facility in handling in- 
struments of precision, and to cultivate the power of observation. 
The experiments are elementary in character but involve measure- 
ments, such as the following: Determining Linear Dimensions 
with Venier Guages, Micrometer Calipers, Spherometer, Microm- 
eter Microscope: Weighing: Specific Gravity: Specific Heat; Co- 
efficient of Expansion: Wave Length and Pitch of Sound: Current 
Strength, Electro-motive Force and Resistance. 

The Laboratory is quite well provided with instruments of preci- 
sion for electrical testing and measuring. The class in the advanced 
course of electricity devote considerable time to such work. The 
equipment consists of dynamos, motors, galvanometers, electrom- 
eters, volt-meters, ammeters condensers, with their various acces- 
sories: secondary cells; standard cells, standard resistance coils, 
etc. 



THE CHEMICAL LABOEATOEY. 



OFFICERS. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D'., Director, and Professor 
of Chemistry. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

THOMAS CLARKE, Assistant in Chemistry. 



The building formerly known as Person Hall is now used as the 
Chemical Laboratory. It has been greatly added to and forms a 
convenient and well-arranged system of laboratories. The rooms 
are eleven in number and contain about six thousand square feet 
of floor-space. The pitch of the rooms is twenty feet and they are 
lighted by numerous large windows five feet by ten feet in size. 
Thus good ventilation and light are secured. 

There is a large lecture-room, with a seating capacity of one 
hnndred and twenty-five. The sides and rear of the room have 
glass cases for the display of specimens. The room is lig'hted by 
electricity. In addition to its use as a lecture-room, it is used as a 
place of meeting by the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 

Adjoining the lecture-room, is the private laboratory of the Sen- 
ior Professor of Chemistry, and a smaller room for the storage of 
specimens. The west wing of the Laboratory is divided into labo- 
ratories for qualitative and quantitative analysis, furnishing desk- 
space for forty-eight students and fifteen students respectively. 
These laboratories are provided with hoods for carrying off noxious 
gases. There is a small room also, cut off from the other labora- 
tories, in which dangerous or disagreeable experiments may 
be performed. 

The rear portion of the Laboratory is almost a reproduction of 
the front in size and outline. It is divided into a balance-room 



94 THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY 

and library, a dark room for work with the polariscopo and spec- 
troscope and for photography, an assay-room provided with a set 
of gas furnaces, a laboratory for toxicologioal or other special 
work, and a store-room. In the assay-room is placed a large still, 
which provides an abundance of distilled water. 

The laboratories are supplied with gas and water. The expend- 
itures for apparatus amount to about one thousand dollars annu- 
ally. 



THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 



OFFICERS. 

HENRY van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Director, and Professor 

of Biology. 
GEORGE HUGHES KIRBY, Assistant in BiologiJ. 
ROBERT ERVIN COKER, ^Assistanfm Biology. 



The Biological Laboratory occupies the upper floor of the New 
East Building. In addition to a lecture-room, there is a main lab- 
oratory, a smaller laboratory for advanced students, a private 
working-room, and a couple of store-rooms. The entire door-space 
is something over four 1 thousand square feet. 

The general equipment is good, and is adapted to the needs of 
modern microscopical work, including compound and dissecting 
microscopes, microtomes, paraffine and hot air baths, incubator, 
dissecting microscopes, camera lucidas, immersion lenses, etc. All 
rooms in the Laboratory are supplied with running water. In ad- 
dition to the sinks, there are several large aquarium tables in 
which living animals may be kept for breeding purposes, study of 
their habits or class work. 

The museum collections are arranged in cases in the main labora- 
tory. The marine fauna of the Atlantic coast is well represented. 
There are very serviceable collections of bird skins, bird eggs, in- 
sects, and flowering plants. Students engaged in advanced work 
have access to microscopic preparations, illustrating the anatomy 
and development of sponges and corals, the histology of medusae, 
the development of teleosts and other objects of morphological in- 
terest. The departmental library includes many valuable books of 
reference, treatises, and zoological journals. 



THE GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 



OFFICER. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M.. Director, and Professor of Geology and 
Mineralogy. 



The Geological Laboratory occupies the first floor of the New 
East Building'. In addition to a lecture-room with a seating capac- 
ity of about ninety students, there is a large laboratory supplied 
with working collections of minerals, rocks, and fossils, and with 
photographs, maps and models illustrating geological structure. 
The Laboratory is furnished with two petrographical microscopes 
also, one of them manufactured expressly for the University by 
the Bausch and Lomb Optical Company. Microscopic slides have 
been made of most of the specimens from North Carolina; and the 
department has, also, sections of the typical European minerals 
and. rocks. Sections of the rocks around Chapel Hill, and of the 
igneous rocks of the Boston basin, made by the late Hunter Lee 
Harris, of the Class of 1889, have been donated to the geological 
department. 

The University possesses a collection of more than two thousand 
specimens of typical rocks and minerals from various European 
localities, and of large specimens of building-stones, coals, and va- 
rious products illustrating the economic geology of the State. 
These are arranged in an exhibition room of six hundred and fifty 
square feet of floor-space. Here are kept also the sections taken 
with a diamond drill in the coal regions of Pennsylvania, in the 
region around King's Mountain, where the Summer School in 
Geology holds its sessions, in the Dan River Coal-fields, and in the 
Triassic rocks at Durham, North Carolina. A complete set of the 
ores of the precious metals found along the line of the Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa F^ Railroad has recently been added to the col- 



THE GE0L06ICAL LABOKATORY 9? 

lections. Valuable additions have been made to the collection of 
fossils also, affording increased opportunity for laboratory work in 
historical geology and paleontology. The collection illustrating 
economic g'eology has been largely increased by many fine speci- 
mens secured by Professor Holmes from the Atlanta exhibition. 

The departmental library, which occupies a room adjoining the 
exhibition room, is supplied with State and United States Reports, 
the papers of working geologists, the best works upon geology, 
and scientific periodicals. 



THE GYMNASIUM. 



OFFICER. 

GEORGE GULLETT STEPHENS, Instructor in Physical Culture. 



Memorial Hall is used as the University Gymnasium, affording 
a practically unlimited supply of air, light and space for all sorts 
of gymnastic exercises. Inside the Hall is a running track one 
twelfth of a mile long, and there is an abundant supply of improved 
gymnastic apparatus. 

The general supervision of the Gymnasium is in the hands of a 
committee of two members of the Faculty, one of them being the 
physician of the University. Exercise in the Gymnasium is re- 
quired three hours a week of all members of the College except 
Seniors. Outdoor sports are encouraged as being beneficial to the 
students and very helpful in the discipline of college life. 

An Athletic Field has been enclosed and improved by the gener- 
osity of the Alumni. It affords room for two football fields in the 
fall, and in the spring is well adapted to the baseball practice. 

The Lake Running Track, one sixth of a mile long, with a hun- 
dred yard dash, has recently been added to the Athletic equip- 
ment of the University by the generosity of Mr. Henry Steers 
Lake of the Class of 'SIS. It affords fine facilities for all sorts of 
track athletics. 



THE UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS. 



THE DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC LITERARY SO- 
CIETIES. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies were organ- 
ized in 1795, the year of the opening' of the University. Their ex- 
istence has been inseparably linked with the University, and they 
have shown remarkable power in developing character as well as 
in training the intellect. They offer facilities for practice in de- 
bate, oratory, declamation and essay writing; and their members 
become practically familiar with parliamentary law and usage. 

Each Society owns a large handsomely furnished hall, the walls 
of which are hung with oil potraits of illustrious members. 

Meetings are held by each Society every Saturday night during 
the College year, admission being confined to members. Public 
contests in debate between the two Societies are conducted twice 
a year. During Commencement week, each Society holds its own 
annual festival, upon which occasion medals are awarded for excel- 
lence in debate, oratory, declamation and essay writing'. On Tues- 
day night preceding Commencement, six Representatives elected 
from the two Societies have a public competition in oratory; and 
a medal is awarded to the successful competitor. 

By immemorial custom, students from the eastern half of the 
State usually join the Philanthropic Society, while those from the 
western half join the Dialectic Society. Although membership 
in the Societies is entirely optional, yet it is earnestly recom- 
mended by the Faculty as furnishing unusual opportunities not 
only for literary culture, but also for the development of self-con- 
tuol and power to persuade and control others. 



100 THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB 

THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB. 

• Officers. 

Karl Pomeroy Harrington, A.M., President. 
Francis Kingsley Ball, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
"Walter Dallam Toy, M.A., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Philological Club meets on the last Tuesday night of each 
month during the College year except December and May. Its 
membership consists of the instructors and advanced students in 
the language departments of the University. 

The object of the Club is to stimulate original investigation in 
philology and literature, and to afford an opportunity for the inter- 
chang'e of views on subjects relating to such work. At each meet- 
ing papers are read and discussed. 

All persons interested in the work of the Club are invited to at- 
tend its meetings. 

THE SHAKSPERE CLUB. 

Officers. 

Thomas Hume. D.D., LL.D., President. 
Francis Kingley Ball, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
Herman Harrell Horne, A.M., Secretary. 
John William Canada, Treasurer. 

Professor Toy, and Messrs. A. Cobb, W. E. Darden. W. C. 
Smith, E. P. Carr, R. E. Coker and R. G. Allsbrook constitute, 
with the Officers, the Executive Committee. 

The Shakspere Club was organized in -October, 1885, for the 
special purpose of giving impulse and guidance to scholarly inves- 
tigation of the great dramatist. But an important aim was to of- 
fer opportunity for comparative studies in the dramatic literature 
of ancient and foreign languages, and also to excite interest in the 
art of literary composition. Seminary methods are pursued by ad- 
vanced students, and the results are presented in papers. The Club 
has a small but valuable collection of special reference books, 



THE NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 101 

THE PHILOSOPHICAL CLUB. 

Officers. 

Herman Harrell Hokne, A.M., President. 

John William Canada, Vice-President. 

John Allen Moore, A.B., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Philosophical Club meets on the first Tuesday night in each 
month excepting September. Its membership consists of students 
and instructors in the Philosophical department of the University. 

The object of the Club is to stimulate original thought in Phi- 
losophy. At each meeting two papers are read and discussed 
at length by members of the Club. A standing invitation is given 
to all who are not members of the Club, to attend its meetings and 
join in the discussions. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Officers. 

Kemp Plummer Battle, LL.D.. President. 
George Tayloe Winston, LL.D.. First Vice-President. 
Edwin Anderson Alderman, Ph.B., Second Vice-President. 
Joseph Harvey White, Secretary. 

The North Carolina Historical Society was founded in 1842 by 
the Hon. David L. Swain, LL.D., President of the University. 
Under his leadership it became the center of historical work in the 
State and the medium of many notable contributions to State his- 
tory. On March 22, 1875. through the activity of Dr. Battle, the 
Society was chartered by an Act of the General Assembly. The 
purpose of the Society is to collect, classify, investigate and pub- 
lish material illustrative of the history of the State. The Histor- 
ical Society possesses a valuable collection of books, pamphlets, 
manuscripts, newspaper files, coins and other objects of historic in- 
terest. The educational aim of the Society is to create a love of 



102 THE ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 

historical study and to give training- in scientific methods of histor- 
ical investigation. To this end meetings are held monthly in the 
historical lecture-room, at which papers, based on original re- 
search, are read and discussed. All members of the University 
are eligible to membership. 



THE ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. 

Officers. 

Richard Henry Whitehead. M.D., President. 
Henry van Peters Wilson, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
. Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., Permanent Secretary 
and Treasurer. 
Charles Baskerville, Ph.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society holds monthly meetings 
during the College year for the discussion of scientific subjects. A 
journal is issued semi-annually. The object of the Society is to 
encourage scientific research and to record such matters as per- 
tain to the natural history of the State. The membership is at 
present restricted to the Faculty and students of the University. 

At the monthly meetings, which are ordinarily held on the sec- 
ond Tuesday of each month, excellent opportunities are afforded 
the students to get beyond the ordinary routine of the class-room 
by hearing, reading and discussing papers on scientific subjects. 

The Journal is in a measure a bulletin of the scientific laborato- 
ries of the University, and contains many articles written by stu- 
dents. It is now in its thirteenth year. The volumes already issued 
contain over twelve hundred pages. By the exchange of the 
Journal with over three hundred scientific journals and periodic- 
als, ten thousand books and pamphlets have been collected, all of 
which are arranged in the University Library. 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 103 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Officers. 

Joe Suttle Wray, President. 
Charles Hughes Johnston, Vice-President, 
Peter Harden Eley, Becording Secretary. 
Francis William Coker, Corresponding Secretary. 
Robert Herring Wright, Treasurer. 

The Young Men's Christian Association is a voluntary organiza- 
tion of the students in the University, and is entirely under their 
management. The Faculty are in sympathy with the Association 
and render willing and kindly service whenever requested to do so. 

The object of the Association is to promote growth in grace and 
Christian fellowship among its members, and aggressive Christian 
work among the students. To this end four devotional meetings 
are held every week on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs- 
day evenings, for fifteen minutes, just after supper. 

On the second and fourth Thursday nights of each month the 
service is taken up with the discussion of missionary work. 

Five Bible Classes are devoted to personal work, devotional, 
topical and historical study, and the life and Epistles of Saint 
Paul. In addition to these Classes, Professor Battle delivers a 
half-hour lecture each Sunday morning on the historical aspect of 
the Bible. The Association arranges for monthly sermons by lead- 
ing ministers of all denominations. An efficient committee look 
after the welfare of the sick in the University and see that they 
lack no comfort or convenience. 

A vigorous movement is on foot for a building to cost twenty 
thousand dollars. Nine thousand seven hundred of the amount 
have already been subscribed by the students and by others inter- 
ested in the work. 

On some Saturday evening near the opening of the Session in 
September, the Association gives its annual reception to students 
entering the University. 



ONE HUNDREDTH COMMENCEMENT. 

IMS—. 

JUNE 2, BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Alexander Lacy Phillips. 

JUNE 4. 

Orations by Representatives from the Dialectic and 
Philanthropic Literary Societies. 

Dialectic Society. Philanthropic Society. 

McKay Bernard Aston, James Arthur Butt, 

John William Canada, Van Astor Bachelor. 

Robert Rowland Ragan. Richard Gold Allsbrook. 

Faculty' Reception in the Gymnasium. 

JUNE 5, ALUMNI DAY. 

The University 1705-1860, by Alfred Moore Waddell. 
The University 1860-1675* by Henry Armand London. 
The University I87&-1895. by Adolphus Hill Eller. 
The University' Alumni in the War, by Stephen Beaure- 

guard Weeks. 
Centennial Ode, by James D. Lynch. 
Centennial Song, by Cornelia Phillips Spencer. 
Centennial Sonnet, by Henry Jerome Stockard. 

Reunion of Classes. 

JUNE 6, COMMENCEMENT. 

Senior Speaking. 
Joe Eli Alexander. Herman Harrell Home 



105 



Lucius Moody Bristol, 
Lautrec Cranmer Brogden, 



Augustus Lee Quickel, 
Charles Paucett Tomlinson,S.B. 



DEGREES. 

Honorary. 

Doctor of Laws. 

Richard Henry Battle, Thomas M. Holt, 

Cornelia Phillips Spencer, Alfred Moore Waddell, 

William T. Faircloth, Chief Justice North Carolina Supreme. Court, 
David M. Purches, Associate Justice North Carolina Supreme Court, 
Walter A. Montgomery, Associate Justice North Carolina Supreme 

Court. 



Doctor of Divinity. 



Alexander Davis Betts, 
Johnson Carmon Davis, 



* Alexander Lacy Phillips, 
Robert Strange. 



In Course. 



Bachelor of Arts. 



Herbert Bingham, 
Lucius Moody Bristol, 
John Thomas Farrell, 
William Alexander Graham, 
Herman Harrell Home,' 



William Claudius McAlister, 
Daniel K. McRae, 
John Allen Moore, 
Charles Root Turner, 
Walter Crump Wicker, 



Marshall Hill Yount. 



Bachelor of Philosophy. 



Joe Eli Alexander, 
Wilmot Brown Allen, 
Lautrec Cranmer Brogden, 
George Humphrey Carpenter, 
Frederick Louis Carr, 
James Osborne Carr, 



Harry Howell, 
Ashbel Brown Kimball, 
John Worth McAlister, 
Holland McTyeire Thompson, 
Charles Fawcett Tomlinson, 
Leslie Weil, 



Robert Edgar Zachary. 



106 



Bachelor of Science. 



■ptx) 



Murray Borden, Dudley Lindsey, 

Thomas Evans Westman Brown,,. Thomas Robinson Little, 
Henry Edward Cohen Bryant, John Edward Mattocks, 

James Frierson Gaither, Edward Warren Myers, 

William Clarence Kluttz, John Legerwood Patterson, 

Robert Thomas Stephen Steele. 

Bachelor of Letters. 

Augustus Lee Quickel, William Levy Scott, 

William Jackson Weaver. 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Henry Clark Bridges, 

George Mordecai Graham, ph.b., 

Fordyce Cunningham Harding, PH.B., 

Guy Carlton Lee, a.b. (A« *Uu~a«<~- 

Master of Arts. 

Herman Harrell Home, A.B., 
Jesse Morrow Oldham, A.B., 
Marshall Hill Yount, a.b. 



HONORS. 

Junior Class. 

Honors: John William Canada, John Carlton Eller, John Fred- 
erick Webb, William Robert Webb, Jr. 

Sophomore Class. 

Honors: Burton Craige, Darius Eatman, William Burder Fer- 
guson, Jr., Ralph Henry Graves, William Cobb Lane, John 
Brown Lindsey, Jr., William Herbert McNairy, Wingate Under- 
bill. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES 10^ 

Freshman Class. 

Honors: Charles Stuart Carr, Jesse Knight Dozier, Peter 
Harden Eley, Edward Kidder Graham, Richard Henry Lewis, Jr., 
Willis G randy Peace, Jonathan Dickinson Sowerby, James Webb, 
Jr. 



SPECIAL CERTIFICATES. 

Latin: James Osborne Carr. 

French: Joe Eli Alexander. 

German: Ashbel Brown Kimball. 

English: Joe Eli Alexander. 

History: Holland McTyeire Thompson. 

Mathematics: Joe Eli Alexander, Ashbel Brown Kimball. 

PHYSICS: Dudley Lindsey. 

Chemistry: John Legerwood Patterson. 

MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Hume Medal: Holland McTyeire Thompson. 

The Mangum Medal: Herman Harrell Home. 

The Representative Medal: Richard Gold Allsbrook. 

The Hill Prize: Charles Pawcett Tomlinson. 

The Holt Prize: John Thomas Parrell. 

The Kerr Prize: William Jackson Weaver. 

The Worth Prize: Herman Harrell Home. 



SUMMARY. 



Boards of Government and Instruction, and Other Officers. 

Trustees 81 

Faculty 18 

Instructors 14 

Assistants 6 

38 

Other Officers 5 

Students. 

The College:— . . 

Graduate Students 13 

Senior Class 39 

Junior Class 51 

Sophomore Class 67 

Freshman Class 103 

Optional Students 70 

333 

The Law School:— 

Second- Year Students 1 

First- Year Students 26 

Summer-School Students 31 

58 

The Medical School 30 

The Summer School 140 

Whole number of Students 561 

Names inserted twice 27 



534 



INDEX. 



Admission of Optional Students, 58. 
to Advanced Standing, 56. 
College, 54. 
Law School, 72. 
Medical School, 78. 
Summer School, 85. 
Aid, Pecuniary. 50. 
Alumni Day, 104. 
Assignment of Rooms, 53. 
Assistants, 16. 

Anglo-Saxon, Courses in, 28, 82. 
Athletic Sports, 10, 98. 
Bachelor's Degree. See Degree. 
Beneficiary Aid, 50. 
Biological Laboratory, 95. 
Biology, Courses in, 36. 
Board. See Expenses. 
Boards of Government and Instruction, 

12. 
Calendar, 6. 
Certificates, Special, in College, 45, 107. 

in Summer School, 84. 
Candidacy for Advanced Degrees, 47. 
Chapel Exercises, 11. 
Charter of the University, 7. 
Chemical Laboratory, 93. 
Chemistry. Courses in, 34, 82. 
Christian Association, 102. 
College, 19. 

Admission to, 54. 
Expenses, 52. 
Registration, 58- 
Scholarships, 51. 
Tear, 10. 
Commencement, 10, 104. 

Parts, 44, 104. 
Conditions. Examinations for the Re- 
moval of, 57. 
Conferences, Educational, 84. 
Contents, table of, 3. 
Courses for Students not Candidates for 

a Degree, 45. 
Courses of Instruction. See Greek, &c. 
Courses leading to Degrees, 41. 
Bachelor of Arts, 41. 
Laws, 72. 
Philosophy, 42. 
Science, 43. 
Culture, General, 11. 
Physical, 10. 
Religious. 11. 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 10, 41, 47, 105. 
Bachelor of Laws, 10, 72, 10G. 
Bachelor of Philosophy, 10, 42, 

47. 55, 105. 
Bachelor of Science, 10, 43, 47, 

55, 106. 
Doctor of Philosophy, 10, 48. 
Master of Arts, 10, 48, 106, 
Master of Philosophy, 10, 48. 
Master of Science, 10, 48. 
Degrees conferred in 1895, 105. 
Honorary, 105. 
with Distinction, 44. 



Departments of the University, 10, 18. 
Dialectic Literary Society, 99. 
Discipline, 11. 
Doctor of Laws, 105. 

Philosophy, 10, 48. 
Doctor's Degree, 10, 48, 105. 
Education, History and Philosophy of. 

See Pedagogy. 
Educational Conferences, 84. 
Elective Studies, 41. 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 101. 
English, Courses in, 26, 82. 
for Admission, 54. 
Prizes in, 50. 
Equipment of the University. 9. 
Examinations for Admission. See Ad- 
mission. 
Examinations for the Removal of Con- 
ditions, 57. 
Expenses, College, 52. 

Law School, 72. 
Medical School, 78. 
Summer School,*84. 
Faculty, College, 19. 

Law School, 70. 
Medical School, 77. 
Summer School, 80. 
University, 15. 
Fees. See Expenses. 
Free Tuition, 52. 
French, Courses in, 26, 81. 
Geological Laboratory, 96. 
Geology and Mineralogy, Courses in, 37, 
83. 

Prize in, 50. 

Summer Courses in, 39, 83. 
German, Courses in, 25. 81. 
Government of the University, 7. 
Grades of Scholarship, 43. 
Graduate Students, 47. 

Admission of, 47. 
Degrees, 47. 
Greek. Courses in, 21,81. 
for Admisson, 54. 
Prize in, 51. 
Gymnasium, 98. 
History, Courses in, 30,82. 

Prize in, 50. 
History and Philosophy of Education. 

See Pedagogy. 
Holidays, 10. 

Honorary Degrees, 10, 105. 
Honors, 44, 106. 
Infirmary, 9. 11. 
Instruction, Courses of. See Greek, 

Latin, &c. 
Instructors in College, 16. 

Summer School, 80. 
Laboratory, Biological, 95. 
Chemical, 93. 
Geological, 96. 
Physical, 92. 
Latin, Courses in, 22, 81. 
for Admission, 54. 



110 



Law School, 70. 

Admission, 72. 
Faculty, 70. 

Courses of Instruction, 70. 
Degree of LL.B., 7-2. 
Expenses, 72. 
Moot Court, 71. 
Registration, 72. 
Students, 73. 
Summer School, 73. 
Library, University, 90. 
Literary Societies, 99. 
Loan Funds, 52. 
Location of the University, 9. 
Master's Degree. See Degrees. 
Mathematics, Courses in/32, 82. 
for Admission. 55. 
Prize in. 50. 
Medals, 50, 107. 
Medical Attention, 11. 
Medical School, 76. 

Admission, 78. 

Courses of Instruction, 

77. 
Expenses. 78. 
Faculty. 77. 
Foundation, 76. 
Registration, 78. 
Students, 79. 
Mental and Moral Science. See Philoso- 
phy. 
Metaphysics. See Philosophy. 
Mineralogy. -See Geology. 
Modern Languages. See German, &c. 
Music, Courses in, 84. 
Natural Philosophy. See Physics. 
North Carolina Historical Society, 101. 
Officers in University, 16. 
Optional Students. 67. 

Admission of, 58. 
Organizations of the University, 99. 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific 

Society, 101. 
N. C. Historical Society, 

101. 
Philological Club. 100. 
Sbakspere Club. 100. 
Young Men's Christian 
Association, 102. 
Pecuniary Aid, 50. 
Pedagogy. Courses in. 39, 83. 
Philanthropic Literary Society, 99. 
Philological Club, 10o: 
Philosophy, Courses in, 29. 
Physical Culture, 10. 



Physical Laboratory. 92. 

Physics. Courses in, 33. 82. 

Political and Social Science, Courses in' 

32. 
Political Economy. See Political and 

Social Science. 
Prizes. 50. 107. - 
Registration, in College, 58. 

Law School. 72. 
Medical School, 78. 
Summer School, 85. 
Religious Culture, 11. 
Rooms, Assignment of, 53. 
Scholarship, Grades of, 43. 
Scholarships. 51. 
Sbakspere Club, 100. 

Social Science. See Political and So- 
cial Science. 
Societies. See Organizations. 
Special Certificates, 45. 107. 
Special Students. See Optional Stu- 
dents. 
Studies. See Greek. Latin. &c. 
Students not Candidates for a Degree, 
10. 

College. 59. 
Graduate. 10, 47. 59. 
Law School, 73. 
Medical School. 79. 
Optional, 58, 67. 
Summer School, 86. 
Summary, 108. 
Summer School. 80. 

Admission, 85. 
Certificates. 84. 
Courses of Instruction. 

81. 
Educational Conferen- 
ces, 84. 
Expenses, 84. 
Faculty, 80. 
Instructors, 80. 
Registration. S5. 
Students, 86. 
Trustees. 12. 
Tuition fee, 53. 

Free. 52. 
University Library, 90. 

Organizations. See Organ- 
izations. 
Vacations. 6, 10. 
Worship. 11. 
Tear. College, 10. 

Young Men's Christian Association, 11, 
102. 



APPLICATION FOR LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 



Chapel Hill, N. C.,___ .« i8g 

I hereby request permission to be absent from Chapel Hill from 

\ck on_ i8g____ until o'clock on i8g. 

isit _. 

the purpose of _ _ _ _ 



we the written permission of my parent {or guardian). 



proved . 



.Signed. 



APPLICATION FOR LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 






Chapel Hill, N. C.,'_ _ 189 

' I hereby request permission to be absent from Chapel Hill from 

ck on 189.... until o'clock on 189.. 

the purpose of _ 

we the written permission of my parent {or guardian*). 

_ _ __ Signed. 

iroved : 



DAm 


' REPORT OF ABSENCES. 

i8g 






NAME. 


CLASS. 


HOUR. 


REMARKS. 




































































- 


























Instructor.